News Iran Shutting Down Morality Police, Official Says, After Months of Protests

Kartal1

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Iran Shutting Down Morality Police, Official Says, After Months of Protests​

The move appeared to be a concession to the protest movement that erupted after the death of Mahsa Amini, a young woman who was being held by the morality police for supposedly violating Islamic dress rules.

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Demonstrators in Tehran in October. The protests ignited by the death of Mahsa Amini have grown to encompass the entire range of discontents with Iran’s rulers.Credit...via Associated Press

Vivian Yee
By Vivian Yee
Dec. 4, 2022Updated 1:17 p.m. ET

Iran has abolished the morality police, according to remarks by the attorney general carried on state media, following months of protests set off by the death of a young woman who was being held by the force for supposedly violating the country’s strict Islamic dress laws.
The decision, reported by state news outlets late Saturday night, appeared to be the government’s first major concession to the protest movement ignited by the death of the young woman, Mahsa Amini, 22, in September in the custody of the morality police. The unrest has amounted to one of the biggest challenges in decades to Iran’s system of authoritarian clerical rule.
The morality police “was abolished by the same authorities who installed it,” Attorney General Mohammad Javad Montazeri said in remarks during a meeting on Saturday where officials were discussing the unrest, according to state media reports. But he went on to suggest that the judiciary would still enforce restrictions on “social behavior.”
On Thursday, the attorney general said that the authorities were reviewing the law requiring women to cover their bodies in long, loose clothing and their hair with a head scarf or hijab and would issue a decision within 15 days. But it was not immediately clear whether the authorities were planning to relax the law, which remains in place.

The absence of any official government statement on disbanding the force left some to question where the policy stood exactly. But by late Sunday, the authorities had not issued a denial on state media outlets either, even after the attorney general’s remarks were widely reported by the international news media.

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what

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I believe it when I see it. They will probably rebrand it, get things calm before going back to their old habits.
 

Kartal1

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I believe it when I see it. They will probably rebrand it, get things calm before going back to their old habits.
This is a clear sign that the pressure towards the Iranian Regime is high. For sure they will try that but I wonder what would be the consequences if another case like this happens or something similar.

The power of the Regime is shaken and I think an irreversible process within the Iranian youth has started that will lead Iran to a brighter future past the Mullah mentality. I just hope that this transition happens without too much blood spilled. One thing is for sure. Turkey will play a major role in this.
 

Kedikesenfare

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I believe it when I see it. They will probably rebrand it, get things calm before going back to their old habits.
Exactly. They will shut down the actual organization to create the illusion of social reforms while transferring the same duties and obligations to another state institution. I believe the Iranian regime already pointed out that the justice department could play a bigger role. Nothing is going to change in reality - except on paper.
 

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This is a clear sign that the pressure towards the Iranian Regime is high. For sure they will try that but I wonder what would be the consequences if another case like this happens or something similar.

The power of the Regime is shaken and I think an irreversible process within the Iranian youth has started that will lead Iran to a brighter future past the Mullah mentality. I just hope that this transition happens without too much blood spilled. One thing is for sure. Turkey will play a major role in this.

I prefer if Iran collapses really
 

YeşilVatan

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Iran collapsing has its positives and negatives.

Positives:
1- Threat of a nuclear Iran is gone. Which is a big one for me.
2- Assad is out of manpower. We can finally put an end to this Syrian circus.
3- Russia is all out of friends in the region.
4- Shia crescent project is dead in the water
5- Armenia is geopolitically isolated.

Possible positives
1- South Azerbaijan can be free. Together with Northern Azerbaijan and Turkey, these three countries have the potential to actually form a power block that can rival Europe and China in the old world. (Atsızcı hard-on intensifies)
2- Kurdish part can't be used against Turkey anymore, since we can just intervene. They turned a blind eye to PKK using that part in the past before.
3- Oil pricess fall because Gulf states have no reason to keep a military anymore.

Negatives:
1- Refugee wave.
2- Economic problems stemming from not buying Iranian gas (idk much about this issue though)
3- Iranians will more than likely go out guns blazing. We can expect chemical attacks with ballistic missiles and such.
4- Less wonky Iranian military gadgets to laugh at. Looking at you, F-313.

Possible negatives:
1- Iraq gone, Syria gone, Iran gone, now might be Turkey's turn. Usually I don't go into kurtlar vadisi crap but that's some Greater Middle East Project stuff.
2- Gulf states may perceive Turkey as the next 'threat'.
 

Merzifonlu

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They will probably rebrand it, get things calm before going back to their old habits.
I agree. The Persian Mullah Regime (Beware! I said Persian, not Iran. Because as far as I understand, the Iran we know does not exist anymore.) is not a regime that will regret its mistakes and learn from its mistakes. Hypocrisy and fraud are ingrained in their genetic code.
 

Kedikesenfare

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Western media inaccurately reported that the Iranian regime abolished its morality patrol on December 4.[1] The regime has not made such a concession. Western outlets misinterpreted remarks from Prosecutor General Mohammad Javad Montazeri on December 3. Montazeri noted in response to a journalist’s question that security forces have reduced morality patrols in recent months—a statement that some Western media has mistakenly framed as confirmation that the regime abolished the patrols.[2] Iranian state media later clarified that Montazeri was only acknowledging the reduced morality patrols rather than announcing an end to the program.[3] No other Iranian official has indicated that the regime has ended the patrol.

 
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