UK £3.95bn awarded for next phase of AUKUS submarine programme

Afif

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The Ministry of Defence has awarded £3.95 billion of funding to BAE Systems for the next phase of the UK's next-generation nuclear-powered attack submarine programme, known as SSN-AUKUS.

SSN-AUKUS will be the largest, most powerful and advanced attack submarines the Royal Navy has ever operated and will eventually replace the Astute class, which BAE Systems builds at its site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

The funding follows the AUKUS announcement in March by the leaders of Australia, the UK and the United States. This will eventually see Australia and the UK operate SSN-AUKUS submarines, which will be based on the UK’s next generation design, incorporating technology from all three nations, including cutting-edge US submarine technologies.

Having started early design work in 2021, the £3.95bn funding will cover development work to 2028, enabling BAE Systems to move into the detailed design phase of the programme and begin to procure long-lead items. Manufacture will start towards the end of the decade with the first SSN-AUKUS boat due to be delivered in the late 2030s.

The award will also fund significant infrastructure investment at BAE Systems' site in Barrow-in-Furness, investment in its supply chain and recruitment of a more than 5,000 people.


"This multi-billion-pound investment in the AUKUS submarine programme will help deliver the long term hunter-killer submarine capabilities the UK needs to maintain our strategic advantage and secure our leading place in a contested global order. I’m committed to backing our defence industry, because it’s only with the mission critical support of businesses like BAE Systems that the UK can develop the advanced equipment our Armed Forces need to defend the British people in a more dangerous world."
Grant Shapps, Defence Secretary



"We’re incredibly proud of our role in the delivery of this vitally important, tri-nation submarine programme. This funding reinforces the Government’s support to our UK submarine enterprise and allows us to mature the design, and invest in critical skills and infrastructure to support our long-term national security."
Charles Woodburn, BAE Systems’ Chief Executive

BAE Systems has already delivered five of seven Astute class submarines to the Royal Navy with the remaining two boats at advanced stages of construction. The Company is also designing and building the UK's next-generation nuclear deterrent submarines, Dreadnought, with work underway on three of the four new boats.

Delivery of the UK’s submarine programmes is a national endeavour between government and industry. BAE Systems’ Submarines business plays a vital role in the UK economy, particularly in the north west of England. By the end of this year, its workforce will grow to 12,500, including around new 900 apprentices and graduates.

The business plans to recruit an additional 2,700 people next year, which will include a further 900 apprentices and graduates providing a significant employment boost for the region.



Gentlemen, it is on! When fully realized, SSN-AUKUS will have strategic impact on Indo-Pasific security arrangement @Gary @Bogeyman @Nilgiri et al.
 

Bogeyman 

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The Ministry of Defence has awarded £3.95 billion of funding to BAE Systems for the next phase of the UK's next-generation nuclear-powered attack submarine programme, known as SSN-AUKUS.

SSN-AUKUS will be the largest, most powerful and advanced attack submarines the Royal Navy has ever operated and will eventually replace the Astute class, which BAE Systems builds at its site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

The funding follows the AUKUS announcement in March by the leaders of Australia, the UK and the United States. This will eventually see Australia and the UK operate SSN-AUKUS submarines, which will be based on the UK’s next generation design, incorporating technology from all three nations, including cutting-edge US submarine technologies.

Having started early design work in 2021, the £3.95bn funding will cover development work to 2028, enabling BAE Systems to move into the detailed design phase of the programme and begin to procure long-lead items. Manufacture will start towards the end of the decade with the first SSN-AUKUS boat due to be delivered in the late 2030s.

The award will also fund significant infrastructure investment at BAE Systems' site in Barrow-in-Furness, investment in its supply chain and recruitment of a more than 5,000 people.










BAE Systems has already delivered five of seven Astute class submarines to the Royal Navy with the remaining two boats at advanced stages of construction. The Company is also designing and building the UK's next-generation nuclear deterrent submarines, Dreadnought, with work underway on three of the four new boats.

Delivery of the UK’s submarine programmes is a national endeavour between government and industry. BAE Systems’ Submarines business plays a vital role in the UK economy, particularly in the north west of England. By the end of this year, its workforce will grow to 12,500, including around new 900 apprentices and graduates.

The business plans to recruit an additional 2,700 people next year, which will include a further 900 apprentices and graduates providing a significant employment boost for the region.



Gentlemen, it is on! When fully realized, SSN-AUKUS will have strategic impact on Indo-Pasific security arrangement @Gary @Bogeyman @Nilgiri et al.
It will enter the inventory only at the end of the 2030s. This is too late. I'm sure even our MİLDEN project will enter the inventory sooner. The men are in no hurry. They act as if there is no crisis like the Taiwan crisis on their minds. This comfort will cause trouble for them.
 

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Yeah, 2030. That's if everything goes right and on schedule, which they won't anyway.

And then talk about the first hull to the next. First in class HMS Astute became operational in 2010 and it's 5th came 12 years later but still in sea trial. I'm not counting Australia's shipbuilding to be any faster. In a decade China will be a significantly different beast altogether. Am not counting that 2023 China ASW = 2030 China ASW.

When it comes to submarine game, the US and Japan are Asia-Pacific hope against an aggressive China underwater expansion
 

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It will enter the inventory only at the end of the 2030s. This is too late. I'm sure even our MİLDEN project will enter the inventory sooner. The men are in no hurry. They act as if there is no crisis like the Taiwan crisis on their minds. This comfort will cause trouble for them.
For the UK 2030s is fine. The Astute class is very modern and one of the best SSNs.
For Australia they are suppose to get US Virginia class submarines in the early 2030s. Also building the infrastructure to operate nuclear submarines and training personnel for nulcear submarine is very expensibe and takes a long time. It can't be compared to operating SSKs.

MİLDEN is an SSK and much eaiser to design, build and operate compared to an advanced SSN like SSN-AUKUS.
 

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For the UK 2030s is fine. The Astute class is very modern and one of the best SSNs.
For Australia they are suppose to get US Virginia class submarines in the early 2030s. Also building the infrastructure to operate nuclear submarines and training personnel for nulcear submarine is very expensibe and takes a long time. It can't be compared to operating SSKs.

MİLDEN is an SSK and much eaiser to design, build and operate compared to an advanced SSN like SSN-AUKUS.
Yes, as you said, MİLDEN is not a nuclear submarine. However, this is not the first time they have designed a nuclear submarine. They have decades of accumulated experience. We will start from scratch. Even though they are so experienced, it is impossible to explain why they were able to put the program into inventory after almost 20 years. If we had something like this, that project would be declared dead. This project cycle even goes against the nature of the defense industry. Because 17-20 years is a very long calendar. And here the opposite side will develop its own advanced technologies. Maritime patrol planes, anti-submarine warfare ships, their own submarines, etc. This is like starting the race ahead and letting the gap close.
 

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Yes, as you said, MİLDEN is not a nuclear submarine. However, this is not the first time they have designed a nuclear submarine. They have decades of accumulated experience. We will start from scratch. Even though they are so experienced, it is impossible to explain why they were able to put the program into inventory after almost 20 years. If we had something like this, that project would be declared dead. This project cycle even goes against the nature of the defense industry. Because 17-20 years is a very long calendar. And here the opposite side will develop its own advanced technologies. Maritime patrol planes, anti-submarine warfare ships, their own submarines, etc. This is like starting the race ahead and letting the gap close.

There should be a concern also with the overall readiness of the fleet, assuming the first-in-class enters the fleet in the late 30s, and the next hulls will be in commission every 4-5 years, even if finally they manage to complete all 5 planned subs, by the time the last boats declared operational the first one will be quite old and used by that time.

Then there's the sheer size of the Pacific and the force involved, 5 SSN-AUKUS isn't enough China could readily lose 10 ASW ships for every SSN-AUKUS sent to the Davy Jones Locker.

On the other hand advanced model SSK like the 039C will have the same effect like the SSN blowing up shipping, But China is building those at the rate more twice that of SSN exclusive navy (US,UK,AUS).
 

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There should be a concern also with the overall readiness of the fleet, assuming the first-in-class enters the fleet in the late 30s, and the next hulls will be in commission every 4-5 years, even if finally they manage to complete all 5 planned subs, by the time the last boats declared operational the first one will be quite old and used by that time.

Then there's the sheer size of the Pacific and the force involved, 5 SSN-AUKUS isn't enough China could readily lose 10 ASW ships for every SSN-AUKUS sent to the Davy Jones Locker.

On the other hand advanced model SSK like the 039C will have the same effect like the SSN blowing up shipping, But China is building those at the rate more twice that of SSN exclusive navy (US,UK,AUS).
I think the USA and its allies need a serious mentality revision.
 

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There should be a concern also with the overall readiness of the fleet, assuming the first-in-class enters the fleet in the late 30s, and the next hulls will be in commission every 4-5 years, even if finally they manage to complete all 5 planned subs, by the time the last boats declared operational the first one will be quite old and used by that time.

Then there's the sheer size of the Pacific and the force involved, 5 SSN-AUKUS isn't enough China could readily lose 10 ASW ships for every SSN-AUKUS sent to the Davy Jones Locker.

On the other hand advanced model SSK like the 039C will have the same effect like the SSN blowing up shipping, But China is building those at the rate more twice that of SSN exclusive navy (US,UK,AUS).

More asymmetric means will need to be explored and developed with regards to the first island chain off China's east coast as result.

The alliance will want to minimize as far as possible a large breakout of chinese fleet formations where the raw equations (whatever the model right now w.r.t lanchester PDE variants etc) go in more best case scenario range for PLAN et al.
 

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