European Union Flag Europe’s Energy Concerns

Bogeyman 

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Divisive 'green' gas investment rules face EU lawmaker vote​


Two European Parliament committees vote on Tuesday on an attempt to stop the EU labelling gas and nuclear energy as climate-friendly investments, and the outcome may indicate whether the full parliament will support or reject the rules next month.

The European Union's executive body, the European Commission, wants to include gas and nuclear energy in the bloc's sustainable finance taxonomy, an investor rulebook designed to help raise massive amounts of private capital to meet EU climate change targets.

EU countries and lawmakers are split, however, over whether the fuels are green enough to earn that label - and could yet reject the EU proposal.

The European Parliament's environment and economic committees will vote at midday on a resolution to reject the rules. The text says gas and nuclear cannot be considered sustainable based on existing EU laws, and labelling them as green would confuse investors.

"Artificial incentives to invest in expensive nuclear and fossil energy at the expense of renewables and other sustainable sectors is the last thing we need," said Green lawmaker Bas Eickhout, one of those who submitted the resolution.

Officials expect a tight vote, with some lawmakers' positions still unclear. Parliament's biggest group, the centre-right European People's Party, does not have a united position and has given its lawmakers a free vote.

Tuesday's outcome will set the stage for when the full European Parliament votes on the resolution in early July. Support from at least half of its 705 lawmakers would block the EU proposal.

The EU's taxonomy aims to steer private capital into investments that support climate change targets, but the gas and nuclear rules have stoked disagreements about how to cut emissions.

Nuclear opponents like Germany cite concerns over radioactive waste disposal, while pro-nuclear states including France say the CO2-free energy source is crucial to meet climate targets.

Gas is similarly divisive, and the invasion of Ukraine by top gas supplier Russia has heightened divisions about reliance on the fuel. Eastern European countries have said gas investments are needed to replace more-polluting coal, while others say labelling CO2-emitting gas as sustainable would undermine the EU's green credentials.
 

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French Nuclear Power Crisis Frustrates Europe’s Push to Quit Russian Energy​


Plumes of steam towered above two reactors recently at the Chinon nuclear power plant in the heart of France’s verdant Loire Valley. But the skies above a third reactor there were unusually clear — its operations frozen after the worrisome discovery of cracks in the cooling system.
The partial shutdown isn’t unique: Around half of France’s atomic fleet, the largest in Europe, has been taken offline as a storm of unexpected problems swirls around the nation’s state-backed nuclear power operator, Électricité de France, or EDF.
As the European Union moves to cut ties to Russian oil and gas in the wake of Moscow’s war on Ukraine, France has been betting on its nuclear plants to weather a looming energy crunch. Nuclear power provides about 70 percent of France’s electricity, a bigger share than any other country in the world.

But the industry has tumbled into an unprecedented power crisis as EDF confronts troubles ranging from the mysterious emergence of stress corrosion inside nuclear plants to a hotter climate that is making it harder to cool the aging reactors.

The outages at EDF, Europe’s biggest electricity exporter, have sent France’s nuclear power output tumbling to its lowest level in nearly 30 years, pushing French electric bills to record highs just as the war in Ukraine is stoking broader inflation. Instead of pumping vast amounts of electricity to Britain, Italy and other European countries pivoting from Russian oil, France faces the unsettling prospect of initiating rolling blackouts this winter and having to import power.
EDF, already 43 billion euros (about $45 billion) in debt, is also exposed to a recent deal involving the Russian state-backed nuclear power operator, Rosatom, that may heap fresh financial pain on the French company. The troubles have ballooned so quickly that President Emmanuel Macron’s government has hinted that EDF may need to be nationalized.
“We can’t rule it out,” Agnès Pannier-Runacher, the minister for energy transition, said Tuesday. “We are going to need massive investments in EDF.”

The crunch could not have hit at a worse time. Oil prices touched record highs after the European Union agreed to cut off Russian oil, intensifying economic pain in Europe and adding to a cost-of-living crisis that France and other countries are scrambling to address. The price of natural gas, which France uses to make up for fluctuations in nuclear-powered energy, has also surged.

As Russian aggression redefines Europe’s energy considerations, nuclear energy’s advocates say it can help bridge Europe’s fuel deficit, complementing a shift that was already underway to adapt wind, solar and other renewable energy to meet ambitious climate-change targets.

But fixing the crisis at EDF won’t be easy.

With 56 reactors, France’s atomic fleet is the biggest after the United States’. A quarter of Europe’s electricity comes from nuclear power in about dozen countries, with France producing more than half the total.

But the French nuclear industry, mostly built in the 1980s, has been plagued for decades by a lack of fresh investment. Experts say it has lost valuable engineering expertise as people retired or moved on, with repercussions for EDF’s ability to maintain the existing power stations — or build ones to replace them.

“EDF’s strategy, endorsed by the government, was to delay the reinvestment and transformation of the system,” said Yves Marignac, a nuclear energy specialist at négaWatt, a think tank in Paris. “The more EDF delays, the more skills keep getting lost, technical problems accumulate and there is a snowball effect.”

Mr. Macron recently announced a €51.7 billion blueprint to rebuild France’s nuclear program. EDF would construct the first of up to 14 mammoth next-generation pressurized water reactors by 2035, as well as smaller nuclear plants — the cornerstone of a broader effort to reinforce France’s energy independence and meet climate goals.

But the few new nuclear reactors that EDF has built have been dogged by huge cost overruns and delays. An EDF-made pressurized water reactor at Hinkley Point, in southwest England, won’t start operating until 2027 — four years behind schedule and too late to help Britain’s swift turn from Russian oil and gas. Finland’s newest EDF nuclear power plant, which started operating last month, was supposed to be completed in 2009.

EDF’s recent troubles began mounting just before Russia invaded Ukraine. The company warned last winter that it could no longer produce a steady nuclear power supply, as it struggled to catch up with a two-year backlog in required maintenance for dozens of aging reactors that was put off during coronavirus lockdowns.
Inspections unearthed alarming safety issues — especially corrosion and faulty welding seals on crucial systems used to cool a reactor’s radioactive core. That was the situation at the Chinon atomic plant, one of France’s oldest, which produces 6 percent of EDF’s nuclear power.
EDF is now scouring all its nuclear facilities for such problems. A dozen reactors will stay disconnected for corrosion inspections or repairs that could take months or years. Another 16 remain offline for reviews and upgrades.
Others are having to cut power production because of climate change concerns: Rivers in the south of France, including the Rhône and the Gironde, are warming earlier each year, often reaching temperatures in the spring and summer too warm to cool reactors.
Today, French nuclear production is at its lowest level since 1993, generating less than half the 61.4 gigawatts that the fleet is capable of producing. (EDF also generates electricity with renewable technologies, gas and coal.) Even if some reactors resume in the summer, French nuclear output will be 25 percent lower than usual this winter — with alarming consequences.

“If you have power plants that are operating well below capacity, we will either have to go to blackouts or revert to carbon-emitting energy, which is coal or natural gas,” said Thierry Bros, an energy expert and professor at the Paris Institute of Political Studies.

The government, which owns 84 percent of EDF, has added to the strife. As market electricity prices neared €500 per megawatt-hour last winter, Mr. Macron ordered EDF to increase the power it sells to third-party providers at a capped price of just €46 per megawatt-hour, making good on a political pledge to shield French households from inflation.

But to re-top its power supplies while dozens of nuclear plants are offline, EDF has been forced to buy electricity at the high prices of the open market, at a projected cost of over €10 billion this year. The move so infuriated EDF’s combative chief executive, Jean-Bernard Lévy, that he made a formal appeal to the government.
With turmoil mounting, the French government threw EDF a €2 billion lifeline in February. But that is hardly enough to resolve its woes.
The debt-laden company also faces risks with a government-backed deal linked to Rosatom, a longtime customer of EDF components and the biggest buyer of powerful French-made Arabelle steam turbines, which are found in both Rosatom and EDF nuclear plants.
Despite the war, France has done business as usual with Russia in nuclear power, which has remained exempt from European Union sanctions. Mr. Macron in February backed a deal for EDF to acquire the Arabelle turbine business, valued at €1.1 billion, from General Electric, restoring the manufacturing firm to French ownership after G.E. bought it from Alstom in 2015.
EDF is now seeking a lower valuation for the deal amid fears that Rosatom’s business may stumble, after Finland last month canceled Rosatom contracts for new nuclear plants. Should Rosatom face additional cancellations or building delays in other countries, EDF could face a slump in turbine orders and fresh losses.

For the French nuclear industry to recover, the country’s best bet is to stick with the plan to build a fleet of new nuclear plants, JPMorgan Chase said in a recent analysis.

“If anything, the current crisis makes this project, and the ambition to re-regulate EDF’s nuclear fleet or nationalize it, more legitimate than ever — for France and its European partners,” the bank said.

 

Bogeyman 

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Germany announces fresh measures to cut gas consumption​


Germany on Sunday announced further steps to boost gas storage levels to prepare for the next winter season, when it fears Russia could reduce or even completely halt supplies.

Following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, Germany, which relies on Moscow for most of its gas, is attempting to phase out Russian energy.

Germany's Economy Ministry, which is in charge of security of energy supply in Europe's top economy, said the latest measures would include increased reliance on coal-fired power plants as well as an auction system to incentivise industry to consume less.

It also includes 15 billion euros ($15.8 billion) in credit lines for Germany's gas market operator, via state lender KfW (KFW.UL), to fill gas storage facilities faster, a government source said, asking not to be named.

"The tense situation and the high prices are a direct consequence of (Russian President Vladimir) Putin's war of aggression on Ukraine," Economy Minister Robert Habeck said in a statement.

"What's more, it is obviously Putin's strategy to make us insecure, to drive up prices, and to divide us. We will not let that happen. We will fight back decisively, precisely and thoughtfully."

 

Sami1234

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Italy played it well, even if the Russian gas stopped, Italy will pass the next winter without any problems thanks to the gas coming from Algeria and it will be cheaper.
Gas coming from Asia, Middle East and North Africa Italy will become the gas hub for Europe thanks to its Zero Enemies policy. Italy now reminds me of Turkey before 2010.
 

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It is with great astonishment that I read this topic. What has been written in all 9 pages is just a touch of the real thing. And they didn't say a word about it, unfortunately amazing. If you want to understand the main problem, you have to be familiar with how the prices are created, what we all pay at fuel pumps. The problem is very deep but not gas and oil fields. The problem is who wants to make the money. How so far Europeans or Americans want to sit at the chair?

The money made with the gas, oil und Raw material in the Netherlands, in Switzerland and Southern Cyprus. Partly also in England. I will make you know some companies in order to be able to know better that the real war is not between Russia and Ukraine; but between Europe and the USA.

169px-Gunvor_%28Unternehmen%29_logo.svg.png
250px-Vitol_logo.svg.png
250px-Trafigura_logo.png


250px-Glencore_logo.svg.png


These are the four companies that make hundreds of billions with the business. Let them keep going?

This is the question whose answer is now being sought in Ukrainian flower oil fields.
 
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"If Germany wants to buy gas from us, then develop new deposits with us"

SPIEGEL: Mr. Arkab, are you pleased about the renewed European interest in Algerian gas?

Mohammed Arkab: Our traditional market for natural gas has always been Europe. The majority of our exports go via two pipelines to Spain and Italy. In addition, we supply LNG. We have an interest in expanding our business with Europe and can significantly increase natural gas production in a short period of time. About half of our gas reserves have not yet been tapped.
SPIEGEL: You recently agreed additional deliveries with Italy, an increase of 40 percent of the previous volume. Could you also sell and deliver gas to Germany tomorrow?

"If Germany wants to buy gas from us, then develop new deposits with us."

Arkab: We say: If Germany wants to buy gas from us, then develop new deposits with us. Like the Italians with the ENI group. We have an ambitious $39 billion program to expand production in the oil and gas sector by 2026. The state-owned energy company Sonatrach will raise the majority, and we are looking for partners for the rest. We hope that the Europeans will not change course and leave us alone with the investments. For a long time, Europe upheld environmental protection and made no distinction between oil and gas. As a result, no investments were made.

Arkab: Gazprom is one of many companies investing in Algeria. The Company is not currently engaged in any production other than exploration.

SPIEGEL: Algeria has had close ties with Russia for a long time. Isn't Moscow unhappy that Algeria is increasing supplies to Europe?

Arkab: Algeria is everyone's friend. We are a reliable and safe supplier. We are free to contract with European companies if it is in the interest of both parties. Of course, we cannot serve all of European demand, but we have capacities that are not yet used at all. We want to invite European companies to invest in this production.
 

xenon54

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A tough 2023 is awaiting world economics, it will be tough but that was a lesson to be learned, hopefully after that Europe will be not too dependant on single authocratic gas station country.
Nuclear power should be pushed again, the technology today is better and safer than in the 60s i see no reason not top tap this clean energy, the issues of storing ways is solveable too. Another one is hydro power.
Whats not solveable is making Russia a friendly state, Russia will be Russia forever.

Liberal lefties who cry about these better shut up and produce solutions to the problems instead of creating more and crying more.
 

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A tough 2023 is awaiting world economics, it will be tough but that was a lesson to be learned, hopefully after that Europe will be not too dependant on single authocratic gas station country.
Nuclear power should be pushed again, the technology today is better and safer than in the 60s i see no reason not top tap this clean energy, the issues of storing ways is solveable too. Another one is hydro power.
Whats not solveable is making Russia a friendly state, Russia will be Russia forever.

Liberal lefties who cry about these better shut up and produce solutions to the problems instead of creating more and crying more.


They should begin to build 10 nuclear reactor plants over EU, so they can maintain basic level of energy demand. Green or CO neutral energy is destroying industry.
 

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French Nuclear Power Crisis Frustrates Europe’s Push to Quit Russian Energy​


Plumes of steam towered above two reactors recently at the Chinon nuclear power plant in the heart of France’s verdant Loire Valley. But the skies above a third reactor there were unusually clear — its operations frozen after the worrisome discovery of cracks in the cooling system.
The partial shutdown isn’t unique: Around half of France’s atomic fleet, the largest in Europe, has been taken offline as a storm of unexpected problems swirls around the nation’s state-backed nuclear power operator, Électricité de France, or EDF.
As the European Union moves to cut ties to Russian oil and gas in the wake of Moscow’s war on Ukraine, France has been betting on its nuclear plants to weather a looming energy crunch. Nuclear power provides about 70 percent of France’s electricity, a bigger share than any other country in the world.

But the industry has tumbled into an unprecedented power crisis as EDF confronts troubles ranging from the mysterious emergence of stress corrosion inside nuclear plants to a hotter climate that is making it harder to cool the aging reactors.

The outages at EDF, Europe’s biggest electricity exporter, have sent France’s nuclear power output tumbling to its lowest level in nearly 30 years, pushing French electric bills to record highs just as the war in Ukraine is stoking broader inflation. Instead of pumping vast amounts of electricity to Britain, Italy and other European countries pivoting from Russian oil, France faces the unsettling prospect of initiating rolling blackouts this winter and having to import power.
EDF, already 43 billion euros (about $45 billion) in debt, is also exposed to a recent deal involving the Russian state-backed nuclear power operator, Rosatom, that may heap fresh financial pain on the French company. The troubles have ballooned so quickly that President Emmanuel Macron’s government has hinted that EDF may need to be nationalized.
“We can’t rule it out,” Agnès Pannier-Runacher, the minister for energy transition, said Tuesday. “We are going to need massive investments in EDF.”

The crunch could not have hit at a worse time. Oil prices touched record highs after the European Union agreed to cut off Russian oil, intensifying economic pain in Europe and adding to a cost-of-living crisis that France and other countries are scrambling to address. The price of natural gas, which France uses to make up for fluctuations in nuclear-powered energy, has also surged.

As Russian aggression redefines Europe’s energy considerations, nuclear energy’s advocates say it can help bridge Europe’s fuel deficit, complementing a shift that was already underway to adapt wind, solar and other renewable energy to meet ambitious climate-change targets.

But fixing the crisis at EDF won’t be easy.

With 56 reactors, France’s atomic fleet is the biggest after the United States’. A quarter of Europe’s electricity comes from nuclear power in about dozen countries, with France producing more than half the total.

But the French nuclear industry, mostly built in the 1980s, has been plagued for decades by a lack of fresh investment. Experts say it has lost valuable engineering expertise as people retired or moved on, with repercussions for EDF’s ability to maintain the existing power stations — or build ones to replace them.

“EDF’s strategy, endorsed by the government, was to delay the reinvestment and transformation of the system,” said Yves Marignac, a nuclear energy specialist at négaWatt, a think tank in Paris. “The more EDF delays, the more skills keep getting lost, technical problems accumulate and there is a snowball effect.”

Mr. Macron recently announced a €51.7 billion blueprint to rebuild France’s nuclear program. EDF would construct the first of up to 14 mammoth next-generation pressurized water reactors by 2035, as well as smaller nuclear plants — the cornerstone of a broader effort to reinforce France’s energy independence and meet climate goals.

But the few new nuclear reactors that EDF has built have been dogged by huge cost overruns and delays. An EDF-made pressurized water reactor at Hinkley Point, in southwest England, won’t start operating until 2027 — four years behind schedule and too late to help Britain’s swift turn from Russian oil and gas. Finland’s newest EDF nuclear power plant, which started operating last month, was supposed to be completed in 2009.

EDF’s recent troubles began mounting just before Russia invaded Ukraine. The company warned last winter that it could no longer produce a steady nuclear power supply, as it struggled to catch up with a two-year backlog in required maintenance for dozens of aging reactors that was put off during coronavirus lockdowns.
Inspections unearthed alarming safety issues — especially corrosion and faulty welding seals on crucial systems used to cool a reactor’s radioactive core. That was the situation at the Chinon atomic plant, one of France’s oldest, which produces 6 percent of EDF’s nuclear power.
EDF is now scouring all its nuclear facilities for such problems. A dozen reactors will stay disconnected for corrosion inspections or repairs that could take months or years. Another 16 remain offline for reviews and upgrades.
Others are having to cut power production because of climate change concerns: Rivers in the south of France, including the Rhône and the Gironde, are warming earlier each year, often reaching temperatures in the spring and summer too warm to cool reactors.
Today, French nuclear production is at its lowest level since 1993, generating less than half the 61.4 gigawatts that the fleet is capable of producing. (EDF also generates electricity with renewable technologies, gas and coal.) Even if some reactors resume in the summer, French nuclear output will be 25 percent lower than usual this winter — with alarming consequences.

“If you have power plants that are operating well below capacity, we will either have to go to blackouts or revert to carbon-emitting energy, which is coal or natural gas,” said Thierry Bros, an energy expert and professor at the Paris Institute of Political Studies.

The government, which owns 84 percent of EDF, has added to the strife. As market electricity prices neared €500 per megawatt-hour last winter, Mr. Macron ordered EDF to increase the power it sells to third-party providers at a capped price of just €46 per megawatt-hour, making good on a political pledge to shield French households from inflation.

But to re-top its power supplies while dozens of nuclear plants are offline, EDF has been forced to buy electricity at the high prices of the open market, at a projected cost of over €10 billion this year. The move so infuriated EDF’s combative chief executive, Jean-Bernard Lévy, that he made a formal appeal to the government.
With turmoil mounting, the French government threw EDF a €2 billion lifeline in February. But that is hardly enough to resolve its woes.
The debt-laden company also faces risks with a government-backed deal linked to Rosatom, a longtime customer of EDF components and the biggest buyer of powerful French-made Arabelle steam turbines, which are found in both Rosatom and EDF nuclear plants.
Despite the war, France has done business as usual with Russia in nuclear power, which has remained exempt from European Union sanctions. Mr. Macron in February backed a deal for EDF to acquire the Arabelle turbine business, valued at €1.1 billion, from General Electric, restoring the manufacturing firm to French ownership after G.E. bought it from Alstom in 2015.
EDF is now seeking a lower valuation for the deal amid fears that Rosatom’s business may stumble, after Finland last month canceled Rosatom contracts for new nuclear plants. Should Rosatom face additional cancellations or building delays in other countries, EDF could face a slump in turbine orders and fresh losses.

For the French nuclear industry to recover, the country’s best bet is to stick with the plan to build a fleet of new nuclear plants, JPMorgan Chase said in a recent analysis.

“If anything, the current crisis makes this project, and the ambition to re-regulate EDF’s nuclear fleet or nationalize it, more legitimate than ever — for France and its European partners,” the bank said.

If you read this news carefully, you will see that operating a nuclear power plant is not as easy as you think.
 

xenon54

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They should begin to build 10 nuclear reactor plants over EU, so they can maintain basic level of energy demand. Green or CO neutral energy is destroying industry.
We need at least 4 in switzerland alone, 10 wont cut it.
The problem is such a plant needs about a decade to build (20 years in germany) so we must start now not tomorrow.
 

xenon54

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If you read this news carefully, you will see that operating a nuclear power plant is not as easy as you think.
Yet its a proven technology that can be managed, it just needs a good coordination.
The up side is its currently the only alternative to decrease dependency on fossile fuel.

Number of unplanned reactor shut downs:

1656013289821.png


1656012882603.png


1656013122273.png
 
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Bogeyman 

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Yet its a proven technology that can be managed, it just needs a good coordination.
The up side is its currently the only alternative to decrease dependency on fossile fuel.

Number of unplanned reactor shut downs:

View attachment 45273

View attachment 45271

View attachment 45272
Nuclear power plants are a greater dependency source than oil and natural gas.

FVJm5aeWUAE4yKc


The journey of uranium from mining to nuclear fuel. The Russians have a monopoly on the grinding of Uranium (Uranium oxide) in the 2nd stage and the manufacture of yellow cakes in the 3rd stage.

I have sent a detailed article on the subject for your review.

If the Russians stop sending yellow cakes, it will be difficult for you to run your nuclear power plants. Unless you create your own technology architecture and transfer this knowledge to future generations, you cannot see prosperity.
 

xenon54

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Nuclear power plants are a greater dependency source than oil and natural gas.

FVJm5aeWUAE4yKc


The journey of uranium from mining to nuclear fuel. The Russians have a monopoly on the grinding of Uranium (Uranium oxide) in the 2nd stage and the manufacture of yellow cakes in the 3rd stage.

I have sent a detailed article on the subject for your review.

If the Russians stop sending yellow cakes, it will be difficult for you to run your nuclear power plants. Unless you create your own technology architecture and transfer this knowledge to future generations, you cannot see prosperity.
You sound as if the west does not have this technology, this is nothing new, neither is it exclusive to Russia.
 
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