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SHOX

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For all the aviation lovers of the Indian Sky.
 
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SHOX

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How many Mig 21's are active in İndian Air Force?
Somewhere around 110-113, I found from public sources. All of it has to get shelved within 5 years. Well they are already 10 years late.
 

Blackeyes90

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What we need is a detailed analysis of Indian Air Force and its planes and hi-tec equipment in the first post so we can have a better picture about the capabilities of the İndian Air Force before reading all the replies.
 

SHOX

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What we need is a detailed analysis of Indian Air Force and its planes and hi-tec equipment in the first post so we can have a better picture about the capabilities of the İndian Air Force before reading all the replies.
Yea, but a separate thread will be better. Lets keep it as an eye candy only. All beautiful good res birds.
 

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Patrolling Mumbai Skies, the Sukhoi-30MKI, at 12 km Altitude Marine Drive, Chowpatty

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Test7

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Russia to sign Su-30, MiG-29 Jets Contracts with India by Year End

India is likely to place an order for additional MiG-29 and Su-30 fighters by the end of this year.
"We know that due to objective reasons, the Indian leadership has decided to accelerate the allocation of funds for the purchase of this aircraft. Negotiations are already underway. We look forward to signing contracts, including for 6 Ka-31 helicopters, by the end of 2020," FSMTC official representative Maria Vorobyova was quoted as saying by Interfax Sunday.
Russia to sign Su-30, MiG-29 Jets Contracts with India by Year End

KA-31 AEW helicopter
India’s Defence Acquisition Council (DAC) approved procurement of 12 Su-30MKI fighters for $1.44 billion; and 21 MiG-29 jets for $900 million (includes upgrade of 59 MiG-29s). According to Indian media, DAC green-lighted a $520 million deal for 10 Kamov KA-31 airborne early warning (AEW) helicopters which would likely be based on the Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC).

 

Peace Lover

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The government will sell up to 15 per cent stake in state-run aerospace and defence company Hindustan Aeronautics (HAL) through an offer for sale (OFS), at a floor price of Rs 1,001 per share. The offer could fetch the exchequer around Rs 5,020 crore.
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Through the OFS, the government proposes to sell 3,34,38,750 equity shares, constituting 10 per cent paid-up share capital of the company, with an option to sell an additional 5 per cent stake or 1,67,19,375 equity shares (oversubscription option), HAL said in a regulatory filing.

The offer price is at 15 per cent discount to Wednesday's closing price of Rs Rs 1,177.75, and the OFS will take place on August 27-28 on a separate window of the stock exchanges.


A total of 20 per cent of the offer size will be reserved for retail investors, and they will be allocated offer shares at a discount of 5 per cent to the cut-off price in accordance with the OFS guidelines.

The govt owns 89.97 per cent stake in the company, which was listed in March 2018.

IDBI Capital Markets & Securities, SBICAP Securities and YES Securities (India) will be acting as the seller’s broker for the offer. Of these, IDBI Capital Markets will be acting as the settlement broker.

Ahead of the announcement, HAL shares closed 0.5 per cent higher at Rs 1,177.75 on the Bombay Stock Exchange, while benchmark Sensex climbed 0.6 per cent to 39,074 points. The stock has gained more than 29 per cent over the last one month, and is up 61 per cent for the year to date.

For the fiscal year 2020-21, the government has set a disinvestment target of Rs 2.10 lakh crore. Of this, Rs 1.20 lakh crore will come from disinvestment of public sector undertakings and another Rs 90,000 crore from stake sale in financial institutions.

Last month, FM Nirmala Sitharaman had said the government is working on completing the stake sale process of about 23 public sector companies whose divestment has already been cleared by the Cabinet.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.co...-ofs-on-august-27-28/articleshow/77766618.cms
 

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A more professional board would make the company run more effective. Government should only have a representation imo.
 

Peace Lover

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A more professional board would make the company run more effective. Government should only have a representation imo.
15% stake of HAL is nothing imo unless specific manufacturing/technological units are completely handed over to the private sector. If 15% on a whole, these govt babus wouldn't let the private sector folks take any concrete decisions, would oppose to organizational and operational reforms since that wouldn't allow the PSU schmucks to laze off anymore
 

Saithan

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15% stake of HAL is nothing imo unless specific manufacturing/technological units are completely handed over to the private sector. If 15% on a whole, these govt babus wouldn't let the private sector folks take any concrete decisions, would oppose to organizational and operational reforms since that wouldn't allow the PSU schmucks to laze off anymore

That’s the same problem Turkey has. But luckily not every where.

An example success is danish energy company DONG.
 

Peace Lover

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That’s the same problem Turkey has. But luckily not every where.

An example success is danish energy company DONG.
Frankly, Turkey did a great job in terms of developing it's indigenous arms industry. TAI's new office building and composite materials plant show they're able to imbibe corporate culture which should be the way forward. Though there are some struggles, your ground and rotary wing platforms have really done well in recent times
 

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India is moving towards setting up its new Air Defence Command (ADC), which will eventually be responsible for guarding the country’s airspace against hostile aircraft, missiles, helicopters and drones in an integrated manner, by October this year.

Sources say the headquarters of the ADC, which will bring together all the air defence (AD) weapon systems of the Army, Navy and IAF under its operational command, is likely to come alongside the Central Air Command at Allahabad (Prayagraj). It will be headed by a three-star general (Air Marshal) from the IAF.

Chief of defence staff General Bipin Rawat had in January announced the ADC would be the first new joint command to be established as part of the long overdue process for integration among the three Services, which often pull in different directions.

India till now has only two unified commands, while there are as many as 17 single-Service commands (Army 7, IAF 7 and Navy 3). The first and the only theatre or “geographical” command was set up in the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago in October 2001, while the “functional” Strategic Forces Command to handle the country’s nuclear arsenal came up in January 2003.

The ongoing plan is to also set up “geographical” theatre commands, which will include a maritime command in peninsular India, one or two commands (a northern one west of Nepal and an eastern one east of Nepal) to handle China, one or two commands on the western front with Pakistan (one in J&K and the other to include Punjab, Gujarat and Rajasthan), as was earlier reported by TOI.
Though IAF is primarily responsible for the country’s air defence, the Army and Navy also have their own AD weapons with individual infrastructure and logistics chains.

The wide variety of AD weapons in the armed forces include the Israeli low-level Spyder quick-reaction surface-to-air missile (QR-SAM) systems (15-km range), the indigenous Akash area defence missile systems (25-km range) and the medium and long-range Barak-8 SAM systems (70 to 100-km range) jointly developed by Israeli Aerospace Industries and DRDO.

IAF is now also slated to begin inducting five squadrons of the advanced S-400 Triumf missile systems from Russia from end-2021 onwards, under the $5.43 billion (Rs 40,000 crore) deal inked in October 2018.

With the S-400 systems, which can detect, track and destroy hostile strategic bombers, jets, spy planes, missiles and drones at a range of 380-km, India plans to boost its air defence coverage along the unresolved borders with China and Pakistan as well as around cities like New Delhi.

 

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The second batch of Rafale fighter jets — likely to be four in number — is set to arrive at the Ambala Air Force Station in October as part of the Rs 59,000-crore deal with the French government, ThePrint has learnt.

These will land here after the formal induction ceremony of the first five Rafale fighters, which is to be held on 10 September. The ceremony would be attended by Defence Minister Rajnath Singh and his French counterpart Florence Parly.

Sources in the defence and security establishment said the French defence minister has already confirmed her presence.

Sources said once the ceremony is done, the next set of Rafale fighters would arrive in October. “The next set of fighters, which are likely to be four in number, will arrive in the country in October,” a source said.

Five Rafale jets, including two twin-seaters, had landed on 29 July at the Ambala Air Force Station, home of the first squadron of the French fighters.

They had flown 8,500 km from Merignac in France, with a stopover in UAE.

The Rafales
Known as the 4.5 generation aircraft, the Rafale is considered to be one of the finest fighters in the world and is described as an ‘omnirole’ aircraft that can take up several missions on a single flight.

While India had ordered 36 Rafale fighters in 2016, the numbers are just too small for the IAF, which at present has a strength of 31 squadrons as against the sanctioned one of 42 Squadrons.

Even though the IAF is supposed to come out with a Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) 2.0 for 114 fighters, work on it has been rather slow with a formal tender yet to be issued.

ThePrint had reported that this tender could take time and the main focus right now is to firm up the order of 83 LCA Tejas Mk 1A.

Meanwhile, talks of additional 36 Rafale fighters have also been doing the rounds for long in defence corridors.

 

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The Indian Air Force (IAF) will formally induct its new Dassault Rafale aircraft, procured from France, during a ceremony at Air Force Station Ambala in the state of Haryana on Sept 10.

The aircraft will be part of IAF’s No. 17 Squadron, nicknamed the “Golden Arrows”. The first five Indian Air Force Rafale aircraft arrived at Air Force Station Ambala from France on July 27.

The Chief Guest for the event are the Indian Defence Minister Rajnath Singh and his French counterpart, Minister of the Armed Forces Florence Parly.

The induction ceremony will also be attended by General Bipin Rawat, India’s Chief of Defence Staff (CDS); Air Chief Marshal RKS Bhadauria, Chief of the Air Staff; Ajay Kumar, Defence Secretary; G Satheesh Reddy, Secretary Department of Defence R&D and Chairman DRDO; along with other senior officials of the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and the Armed Forces.

The French delegation will be represented by Emmanuel Lenain, Ambassador of France to India; Air General Eric Autellet; Vice Chief of the Air Staff of the French Air Force and other senior officials. A large delegation of senior functionaries of French Defence Industries which includes Eric Trappier, Chairman and Chief Executive of Dassault Aviation, and Eric Beranger, CEO of MBDA, will also be present during the ceremony.

Minister Florence Parly will be given a ceremonial Guard of Honour on arrival at Delhi. At Ambala the program will include ceremonial unveiling of the Rafale aircraft, a traditional ‘Sarva Dharma Puja’, Air Display by Rafale and HAL Tejas fighter aircraft as well as by ‘Sarang Aerobatic Team’ flying modified HAL Dhruv helicopters.

Afterwards, a traditional water cannon salute will be given to the Rafale aircraft. The programme will culminate with the ceremonial induction of Rafale aircraft to 17 Squadron. After the ceremonial events the Indian and French delegation will have a bilateral meeting.

IAF Rafale Procurement:

In 2016, India signed an inter-governmental agreement with France to purchase 36 Rafale fighter jets in fly-away condition for $8.8 billion. Out of the 36 Rafales ordered for the IAF, 28 are single-seat jets, designated Rafale EH, and the remaining are dual-seat jets, designated Rafale DH.

The Air Force “technically” accepted the first Rafale, twin-seat version of the jet, during a ceremony in Bordeaux on Sept. 19. The aircraft, with tail number RB-001, was accepted by a team led by IAF Deputy Chief Air Marshal VR Chaudhari. RB in the tail number marks the role played by Air Marshal RKS Bhadauria in finalizing the deal to procure the jets in September 2016.

The Indian Air Force formally received its first Rafale aircraft during a ceremony at Dassault Aviation’s Rafale final assembly facility in Mérignac in Bordeaux, France on Oct. 8 last year. This ceremony was attended by the French Minister for Armed Forces Florence Parly and the Indian Defence Minister Rajnath Singh.

As of now, the delivery of ten Rafale aircraft has been completed on schedule. Five of these aircraft will stay back in France for training mission. The delivery of all 36 aircraft is expected to be completed by the end of 2021.

In accordance with the contract. IAF pilots and supporting personnel have been provided full training on aircraft and weapon systems by Dassault. Further batches of IAF personnel will continue the training over the next nine months.

 

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Ten Rafale jets have been delivered to India so far. The delivery of all 36 aircraft is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2021. (Photo:IAF)

The Indian Air Force's all-male Rafale squadron in Ambala is all set to get its first woman fighter pilot soon.
India Today has learnt that one of the IAF's 10 current active woman fighter pilots is undergoing conversion training and will begin active duties flying Rafale jets with the 17 Squadron soon.

The IAF's first 5 Rafale fighters were ceremonially inducted into the Golden Arrows squadron on September 10 in Ambala. Since late August, the jets have flown familiarisation sorties over Ladakh, even landing in Leh on occasion as part of an operational work-up ahead of full operational readiness.
More Rafales will be arriving in October and December, with all 36 on order to be inducted by late 2021.
The woman pilot, who India Today will not identify owing to service sensitivities, has been through the full fighter training course so far and is already operational on MiG-21 fighters.
Women fighter pilots undergo an identical training regimen as their male counterparts. Once they are operational on a fighter type, they undergo conversion training, which as the phrase suggests, is a curriculum pilots need to take when they switch from flying one aircraft to another.
In this case, the woman pilot will be converting from MiG-21 Bison to the Rafale, a vastly different and more modern jet in all respects.
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Flt Lt Avani Chaturvedi (centre), Flt Lt Bhawanna Kanth (right) and Flt Lt Mohana Singh became the first women fighter pilots in 2016. (File photo)

The IAF's 10 women pilots have flown a variety of jets so far, including the Su-30 MKI and MiG-29 UPG. Flt Lt Avani Chaturvedi, Flt Lt Bhawanna Kanth and Flt Lt Mohana Singh became the first women fighter pilots in 2016.
 
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