Live Conflict Ukraine-Russia War

Spitfire9

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Gary

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Seems like Russian navy black sea blockade works. By creating a rift between Ukraine and its biggest backer, Poland.


Polish truckers start round-the-clock blockade of fourth Ukrainian border crossing​

By Karol Badohal and Alan Charlish
November 27, 20232:44 PM UTCUpdated ago




FILE PHOTO: Ukrainian trucks are parked near the Poland-Ukraine border, near the village of Korczowa, Poland




[1/2]FILE PHOTO:Ukrainian trucks are parked near the Poland-Ukraine border, near the village of Korczowa, Poland November 19, 2023. REUTERS/Yan Dobronosov/File Photo Acquire Licensing Rights

WARSAW, Nov 27 (Reuters) - Polish truckers and farmers on Monday started a round-the-clock blockade of access to one of the busiest border crossings with Ukraine, extending a protest that has left over a thousand lorries stranded for days in queues that stretch for miles.
The truckers, now blocking the Medyka crossing as well as three other border crossings, complain they are losing out to Ukrainian companies which offer cheaper prices for their services and which are transporting goods within the European Union, rather than just between the bloc and Ukraine.

"I would like to end this protest as soon as possible, because it is as burdensome for us as for everyone around us," said Tomasz Borkowski, leader of the Committee to Protect Transporters and Transport Employers, a Polish union.
"We have no intention of giving up and we will stand until we get our terms."
Polish truckers started their protest on Nov. 6, demanding that the European Union reintroduce a permit system for Ukrainian truckers entering the bloc and for EU truckers entering Ukraine, with exemptions for humanitarian aid and military supplies.

The system was lifted after Russia invaded the country in 2022.
The truckers also want empty trucks from the European Union to be excluded from an electronic queuing system in Ukraine and measures to stop Belarusian and Russian hauliers setting up companies in Poland to get around sanctions.
The current waiting time for trucks to cross at Medyka, one of eight road border crossings with Ukraine, is 91 hours according to data from the Polish border guard.

Ukraine says the protest is damaging its fragile war-time economy by hampering exports and stopping supplies of essentials like motor vehicle gas (LPG) from entering the country. Kyiv also says humanitarian aid has been blocked, which the protesters deny.

'NO CONSTRUCTIVE TALKS'​

Poland's Infrastructure Minister Andrzej Adamczyk has written to Ukraine to request that EU drivers with empty trucks be exempt from the electronic queuing system at at least two crossings, his ministry said in a statement.

The infrastructure ministry also said that Adamczyk had asked Adina Valean, European Commissioner for Transport, to establish a joint committee to analyse the effects of lifting the requirement to have permits in the bloc's transport market.

However, truckers say that both the outgoing Polish government and a coalition of pro-European Union parties that looks set to take power following last month's national election, have shown a lack of interest in their problems.
"There are no constructive talks, nobody wants to meet with us," said Jacek Sokol of the Committee to Protect Transporters and Transport Employers, referring to the government.

With much attention in Poland focussed on attempts to form a new government, the far-right Confederation party, which argued during the election campaign that Poland had gone too far in helping Ukraine, has been the most vocal supporter of the protests.

The mainstream opposition has laid responsibility at the door of Mateusz Morawiecki's outgoing nationalist Law and Justice (PiS) government.
"It would be good if Polish carriers... blocked Mr Morawiecki, because he is responsible for this situation," said Marcin Kerwinski, a lawmaker from the liberal Civic Coalition (KO) grouping.

In Medyka truckers are joining a protest organised by farmers who are demanding that government support to help them deal with low grain prices be continued.
Two trucks per hour are being let through at Medyka, the protesters say, with exemptions for humanitarian aid and war supplies.
With Ukraine's Black Sea ports - a key export route before the war - virtually blocked by Russia, Ukrainian businesses rely on roads and railways to reroute exports and imports.
Reporting by Karol Badohal, Alan Charlish, Pawel Florkiewicz, editing by Susan Fenton
 

Maximilien Robespierre

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"The beggar is always begging for money"

In the future, if you become the leader of a country whose air force consists of 30 Mig-29s, you will not ask for help from anyone when you go to war with a military giant with a stock of nearly 1500 fighter jets and millions of artillery rockets. You compete with your own means.
 

Gary

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I warned about war fatigue and family-related burdens on the population here in March, never thought the fatigue would come this fast. and never thought that the fatigue would come from their wives.
👇👇

In the end, the fighting men in Ukraine does have the prospect of a long war with Russia or leave the country and find safe place for him and his family to stay. And the family part is why many fighting men in Syria left their country. In the Battlefield they're just as motivated, but enter the family safety equation and the whole motivation started to collapse..and I bet people in Ukraine are no different.


Some interesting reporting here by Reuters, sums up what the mood rn in Ukraine, in line with what I predicted



>When Antonina Danylevych's husband enlisted in the Ukrainian army in March 2022, he had to line up at the draft office alongside crowds of patriotic countrymen. There are no crowds now, she says.​
>The number of men aged over 25 who booked places at universities in the first year of the invasion shot up by 55,000 compared with the year before, Education Minister Oksen Lisovyi wrote on Facebook in September.​
>Trust in the government and parliament has tumbled from 74% in 2022 to 39%, and 58% to 21%, respectively, according to Anton Hrushetskyi, executive director at the Kyiv International Institute of Sociology, a research organisation.​
>The campaign, which has included two protests by 50 to 100 people in Kyiv's main square in recent weeks, illustrates a growing level of exhaustion among Ukrainian troops and the mounting toll that is taking on families back home.​
>This summer Danylevych stumbled across a group on the Telegram messaging site that now has 2,900 like-minded people including wives, mothers and family members who banded together to campaign for the right of war veterans to be demobilised.​
"A lot of the women are on sedatives and tranquilisers," she said, describing a "very depressed" mood of resignation among them.​
 

Ecderha

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Seems like Russian navy black sea blockade works. By creating a rift between Ukraine and its biggest backer, Poland.


Polish truckers start round-the-clock blockade of fourth Ukrainian border crossing​

By Karol Badohal and Alan Charlish
November 27, 20232:44 PM UTCUpdated ago




FILE PHOTO: Ukrainian trucks are parked near the Poland-Ukraine border, near the village of Korczowa, Poland




[1/2]FILE PHOTO:Ukrainian trucks are parked near the Poland-Ukraine border, near the village of Korczowa, Poland November 19, 2023. REUTERS/Yan Dobronosov/File Photo Acquire Licensing Rights

WARSAW, Nov 27 (Reuters) - Polish truckers and farmers on Monday started a round-the-clock blockade of access to one of the busiest border crossings with Ukraine, extending a protest that has left over a thousand lorries stranded for days in queues that stretch for miles.
The truckers, now blocking the Medyka crossing as well as three other border crossings, complain they are losing out to Ukrainian companies which offer cheaper prices for their services and which are transporting goods within the European Union, rather than just between the bloc and Ukraine.

"I would like to end this protest as soon as possible, because it is as burdensome for us as for everyone around us," said Tomasz Borkowski, leader of the Committee to Protect Transporters and Transport Employers, a Polish union.
"We have no intention of giving up and we will stand until we get our terms."
Polish truckers started their protest on Nov. 6, demanding that the European Union reintroduce a permit system for Ukrainian truckers entering the bloc and for EU truckers entering Ukraine, with exemptions for humanitarian aid and military supplies.

The system was lifted after Russia invaded the country in 2022.
The truckers also want empty trucks from the European Union to be excluded from an electronic queuing system in Ukraine and measures to stop Belarusian and Russian hauliers setting up companies in Poland to get around sanctions.
The current waiting time for trucks to cross at Medyka, one of eight road border crossings with Ukraine, is 91 hours according to data from the Polish border guard.

Ukraine says the protest is damaging its fragile war-time economy by hampering exports and stopping supplies of essentials like motor vehicle gas (LPG) from entering the country. Kyiv also says humanitarian aid has been blocked, which the protesters deny.

'NO CONSTRUCTIVE TALKS'​

Poland's Infrastructure Minister Andrzej Adamczyk has written to Ukraine to request that EU drivers with empty trucks be exempt from the electronic queuing system at at least two crossings, his ministry said in a statement.

The infrastructure ministry also said that Adamczyk had asked Adina Valean, European Commissioner for Transport, to establish a joint committee to analyse the effects of lifting the requirement to have permits in the bloc's transport market.

However, truckers say that both the outgoing Polish government and a coalition of pro-European Union parties that looks set to take power following last month's national election, have shown a lack of interest in their problems.
"There are no constructive talks, nobody wants to meet with us," said Jacek Sokol of the Committee to Protect Transporters and Transport Employers, referring to the government.

With much attention in Poland focussed on attempts to form a new government, the far-right Confederation party, which argued during the election campaign that Poland had gone too far in helping Ukraine, has been the most vocal supporter of the protests.

The mainstream opposition has laid responsibility at the door of Mateusz Morawiecki's outgoing nationalist Law and Justice (PiS) government.
"It would be good if Polish carriers... blocked Mr Morawiecki, because he is responsible for this situation," said Marcin Kerwinski, a lawmaker from the liberal Civic Coalition (KO) grouping.

In Medyka truckers are joining a protest organised by farmers who are demanding that government support to help them deal with low grain prices be continued.
Two trucks per hour are being let through at Medyka, the protesters say, with exemptions for humanitarian aid and war supplies.
With Ukraine's Black Sea ports - a key export route before the war - virtually blocked by Russia, Ukrainian businesses rely on roads and railways to reroute exports and imports.
Reporting by Karol Badohal, Alan Charlish, Pawel Florkiewicz, editing by Susan Fenton

I do not think so.
Things are not black and white.

 

Ryder

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I warned about war fatigue and family-related burdens on the population here in March, never thought the fatigue would come this fast. and never thought that the fatigue would come from their wives.
👇👇




Some interesting reporting here by Reuters, sums up what the mood rn in Ukraine, in line with what I predicted



>When Antonina Danylevych's husband enlisted in the Ukrainian army in March 2022, he had to line up at the draft office alongside crowds of patriotic countrymen. There are no crowds now, she says.​
>The number of men aged over 25 who booked places at universities in the first year of the invasion shot up by 55,000 compared with the year before, Education Minister Oksen Lisovyi wrote on Facebook in September.​
>Trust in the government and parliament has tumbled from 74% in 2022 to 39%, and 58% to 21%, respectively, according to Anton Hrushetskyi, executive director at the Kyiv International Institute of Sociology, a research organisation.​
>The campaign, which has included two protests by 50 to 100 people in Kyiv's main square in recent weeks, illustrates a growing level of exhaustion among Ukrainian troops and the mounting toll that is taking on families back home.​
>This summer Danylevych stumbled across a group on the Telegram messaging site that now has 2,900 like-minded people including wives, mothers and family members who banded together to campaign for the right of war veterans to be demobilised.​
"A lot of the women are on sedatives and tranquilisers," she said, describing a "very depressed" mood of resignation among them.​

Once war weariness sets in along with morale plummeting I dont see Ukraine and Russia continuing this war.

If not its just going to be desertion upon desertion then a mutiny.
 

Gary

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Once war weariness sets in along with morale plummeting I dont see Ukraine and Russia continuing this war.

If not its just going to be desertion upon desertion then a mutiny.

It depends on who experience the fatigue early. Russia is 4x the size of Ukraine, with a sufficient industry and economy to back up Putin's campaign.
 

Gary

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Ukrainian spy chief’s wife poisoned, Kyiv says​

Kyrylo Budanov has previously said his wife lives with him at his GUR office due to security concerns.
UKRAINE-RUSSIA-CONFLICT-WAR

Earlier this year a Russian court issued an arrest warrant for Budanov, with media reporting it was linked to an attack on the Kerch Bridge | Yuriy Dyachyshyn/AFP via Getty Images

BY ZOYA SHEFTALOVICH
NOVEMBER 28, 2023 4:39 PM CET
1 MINUTE READ

Ukrainian military intelligence chief Kyrylo Budanov’s wife is being treated in hospital for heavy metals poisoning, according to Andriy Yusov, a spokesperson at the GUR military intelligence agency.
“Marianna Budanova was indeed poisoned by heavy metals. She is now undergoing a course of treatment, which is already coming to an end,” Yusov told Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty’s Ukrainian Service in an interview, confirming earlier media reports that the spy chief’s wife had been the victim of an attack.
Ukrainian media also reported that several military intelligence officials had been poisoned, along with Budanova.
 

Ryder

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It depends on who experience the fatigue early. Russia is 4x the size of Ukraine, with a sufficient industry and economy to back up Putin's campaign.

You gave me an idea.

The war in Ukraine will now be won by who is not tired or fatigued.
 

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Footage of the battle and the first defeat of the Ukrainian Leopard 1A5 tank made in Germany have been published. The battle episode was filmed in the Kupyansk area; the tank was in service with the 44th mechanized brigade of the Ukrainian Army. The tank was not directly hit; the tank was probably damaged by a nearby artillery shell explosion, after which the crew abandoned it. The German Leopard 1A5 tank is a modernization of the first Leopard-1 tank, created in 1987. The tank is very vulnerable as it has thin armor. The thickness of the frontal armor of the tank is up to 70 mm, the turret armor is up to 65 mm, the sides of the tank have armor 35-45 mm thick. Data on the first versions of Leopard 1 tanks.

 

Bogeyman 

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The Biggest Problem With Ukraine’s M-1 Tanks: They Don’t Like Staying Dirty​


The biggest problem with Ukraine’s new fleet of 31 American-made M-1 Abrams tanks isn’t the tanks’ 1,500-horsepower turbine engines. Not really.



No, it’s the filters in the engines’ intakes. The filters keep dirt and debris from fouling and wrecking an M-1’s delicate—but powerful—engine. They require constant cleaning.


If an Abrams’ four-person crew neglects to clean its tank’s filters every 12 hours or so, it might so badly damage the engine that the battalion has no choice but to remove the engine, and potentially the transmission, and ship it away for a lengthy overhaul.


That would remove one of Ukraine’s few M-1s from the battlefield as surely as a Russian mine or missile might do. Deep maintenance of Ukrainian Abrams takes place in Poland.


The 68-ton M-1A1SAs that Ukraine operates are thirsty machines. In the weeks before the administration of U.S. president Joe Biden pledged the M-1 to Ukraine, early this year, many pundits and even some officials worried aloud over the tank’s fuel requirements.

Laura Cooper, a U.S. deputy defense secretary, called the Abrams “a gas-guzzler.”

It’s true an M-1 typically travels just .6 miles per gallon of fuel. But its turbine is flexible if not terribly efficient. The U.S. Army feeds its M-1s jet fuel, but other armies pour cheaper diesel into their Abrams. The Australian army, for one.


There are no indications swapping jet fuel for diesel significantly weighs on the M-1’s performance. So there’s every reason to believe the Ukrainian army will keep things simple and fuel up its Abrams with the same diesel its other tank types burn.

No, it’s the Abrams’ filters that might prove to be the biggest headaches for Ukrainian troops. Twice a day, an M-1 crew must rev its tank’s engine to high revolutions-per-minute in order to trigger a pulse-jet system that blasts air out of the tank rather than into it, shooting dust and debris from the back grille.

That keeps the filters clean across lengthy deployments. Before the Americans added the pulse-jet system to the M-1, in the early 2000s, tank crews—especially those fighting in the desert—openly complained about their vehicles’ reliability.

“Army officials are aware of the problems with high fuel consumption, unreliable fuel pumps and sand-ingestion,” the U.S. Government Accountability Office reported in 1992. “They are working on solutions.”

The solution to the sand-ingestion problem was the twice-a-day pulse-jet cleaning process. It works just fine, as long as crews rigorously adhere to its schedule. Even when they’re getting shot at.

"All those things can be taught to the crew, but if ever they make a mistake—and they will—it blows a million-dollar engine that can't be repaired in the field," Mark Hertling, a retired U.S. Army general, told The Kyiv Independent.

 

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