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Turko

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I think there was a problem of awareness. Saudians couldn't understand where the bullets came from. Obviously as you said , the reason must be they weren't well trained.

Most of Saudians were shot from backside where they didn't expect an ambush.

Our army have been using a tactic that They don't use assault rifles as same caliber as terörists have. So that our soldiers can recognize and differs the shootings.
 

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https://defence-blog.com/houthi-reb...l4-f1U7WP30KqhuItdN2GymMn4cR0TRMKGB1hNVb2wA2o


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Will Houthi offensive on Marib end soon?​

For the past four months, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Yemen has made several calls on Houthi rebels to end their offensive on the city of Marib, but things have yet to change.

In his latest press conference on May 31 in the capital, Sana'a, Martin Griffiths again emphasized the perils of the ongoing attack on Marib, saying the continuation of military activities in several parts of the country, including Marib, is “undermining the prospects of peace in Yemen and puts the lives of millions at risk.”

The Iran-backed Houthi rebels have been mounting a major offensive on the city of Marib since February, aiming to seize control of the government’s last stronghold in the north of the country.

The fact that the Houthis continue to fight in Marib has become an increasing focus of international efforts and “condemnation from the United States, from the UN Security Council, from the P5 and from other international actors as well,” said Timothy Lenderking, the US special envoy for Yemen, in a special briefing via telephone with the US Department of State’s Dubai Regional Media Hub on May 21.

“The Houthis are completely isolated when it comes to the Marib offensive. They are against world opinion on this,” he added.

Marib hosts many state institutions including the Ministry of Defense, possesses the country's largest water, oil and gas reserves, and has the largest electrical station that supplies electricity to most parts of the country.

US Senator Chris Murphy, upon his return from a five-day tour of the Middle East accompanied by Lenderking and Griffiths, said on May 6 that the “Houthis must stop their assault on the city of Marib. If the Houthis enter Marib, a new humanitarian nightmare will ensue, as legions of Yemenis will flee the violence.”

No potential winner

The offensive in Marib is not going anywhere. During the past four months, the Houthis have rejected local and international calls to halt their deadly assault on the city.

Through their media outlets, the Houthis tried to promote the narrative that they were going to seize Marib during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan (from April 13 to May 12) and break their fast inside the city.

“Marib, despite their predictions, did not fall during the month of Ramadan. It’s not falling now, and it’s not going to fall anytime in the foreseeable future,” Lenderking said.

With no accurate data on the death toll of Houthi fighters, the Saudi-led Arab coalition announced the killing of more than 700 Houthis in four days as a result of airstrikes and battles with Saudi-backed Yemeni government forces in February.

The Yemeni army also announced on Feb. 27 the killing of 350 Houthis in Marib in only 30 hours.

According to Houthi media outlets, 522 pro-Houthi fighters were killed during the month of Ramadan, which increased their death toll to 2,852 since the beginning of this year.

“The Houthis are not in a hurry to end the fighting in Marib. Rather, they plan to advance towards neighboring districts like Shabwa and Al-Bayda after taking control of Marib,” General Ahmed Garhash, a retired military expert, told Anadolu Agency.

Despite suffering a significant number of casualties, the areas under Houthi control enable them to have a large amount of manpower to recruit more fighters and continue the war.

Dr. Annelle Sheline, Middle East Research Fellow at the Quincy Institute, believes the Houthis did not halt their assault on Marib because they feel they are winning and have no incentive to stop their offensive now.

“The cease-fire proposals from the US and the Saudis both use UN Security Council Resolution 2216 as their framework, which stipulates that the Houthis must give up their weapons and territory they acquired since 2014. The Houthis have no incentive to engage with such unrealistic maximalist demands,” she told Anadolu Agency.

With potential talks ahead, the Houthis believe that taking control of Marib will make the negotiations work in their “greater favor to obtain the largest possible gains by increasing their influence on the ground,” Garhash said.

International efforts

In order to put more pressure on the Houthis and push them towards stopping their assault on Marib, the US on May 20 imposed sanctions on Muhammad Abd al-Karim al-Ghamari, the head of the general staff of the Houthi militia forces, who is leading the Houthi offensive on Marib, and also Yusuf al-Madani, a prominent leader of Houthi forces and the commander of the so-called fifth military zone, which includes Hudaydah.

Observers view this step as a sign of the international community’s dissatisfaction with the Houthis’ actions in Marib. However, these two Houthi leaders are “not influential in the Houthi movement, and the sanctions were supposed to include Abdul-Malik al-Houthi, the supreme leader of the Houthi movement, or Muhammad Ali Al-Houthi, head of the Revolutionary Committee of the Houthis,” Garhash argued.

The Houthis have repeatedly demanded the lifting of the Saudi blockade on land and airports which prevents food and fuel from entering the country. They refuse to negotiate a cease-fire while the blockade remains in place.

Murphy supports the Houthis' demands, saying the Saudis “must end their blockade of key ports and the Sana’a airport,” and without the ability to freely import food, fuel and other goods, “Yemen's economy has come to a grinding halt, causing disease and starvation.”

However, if the import restrictions were lifted, “it's not at all assured that the Houthis would pause their assault on Marib,” Sheline argued.

Bilateral concessions required

The United Nations has been mediating negotiations for over a year between the warring parties to achieve a nationwide cease-fire, lift restrictions on the freedom of movement of people and commodities to and from Yemen, and relaunch the political process.

“I know how difficult a decision is to transition from wartime to peacetime, to demand the greatest concessions and sacrifice in leadership of the parties. It takes courage to move away from war and the suffering of war and to enter into the uncertainties of peace,” Griffiths said.

To end the fighting in Marib, Sheline thinks that the Saudis, as the main supporter of the Hadi government, either need to enhance their military commitment and provide the Yemeni military with adequate weaponry to be able to decisively push the Houthis back, or the Saudis need to give up and withdraw and allow the Houthis to take Marib, which will likely precipitate an even greater humanitarian crisis as many of the inhabitants will try to flee the Houthi takeover.

“If the Houthis end the Marib siege and the Saudis open up the ports, then a cease-fire, which could lead to a peace process, is possible,” Murphy tweeted.

But “if the Houthis are going to continue to obstruct, then it will be visible to the entire world which party is not favoring peace in Yemen,” Linderking said.

 
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The Ministry of Defense reacted to rumors about Russian troops near the borders



TEXT: ALEXANDER IVANITSKY, November 1, 2021, 18:27


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Western media disseminated information about the relocation of Russian troops near the borders of Ukraine. The Ministry of Defense denies this.




The Ministry of Defense has denied media reports that Russia is again increasing its military grouping near the border with Ukraine after the West-2021 exercises.

"According to the Main Intelligence Directorate of the Ministry of Defense of Ukraine, as of November 1, 2021, an additional transfer of Russian units, weapons and military equipment to the state border with Ukraine has not been recorded," the statement said.

The Ministry of Defense assured that intelligence is monitoring the movement of Russian troops.

The Washington Post wrote about the resumption of the movement of Russian troops near the borders of Ukraine.

It was noted that recently videos have appeared on social networks showing "Russian military trains and convoys carrying large quantities of military equipment, including tanks and missiles, in the south and west of Russia."

Earlier today, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said that Ukraine is trying to create a "provocative situation" and drag Moscow "into violent actions."



The Ukrainian Foreign Ministry replied that they are trying to involve Russia in the diplomatic process, and not forceful actions.
 

Saithan

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Yemen becomes fifth Arab country to recall Lebanese envoy​

BY AGENCIES​

ISTANBUL MID-EAST
NOV 03, 2021 8:50 AM GMT+3
A portrait of Lebanese Information Minister George Kordahi is displayed on a billboard in Sanaa, Yemen, Oct. 31, 2021. (AFP Photo)
A portrait of Lebanese Information Minister George Kordahi is displayed on a billboard in Sanaa, Yemen, Oct. 31, 2021. (AFP Photo)



Yemen became the fifth Arab country to recall its Lebanese ambassador after remarks by Lebanon's Information Minister George Kordahi sparked tensions between Beirut and Riyadh.

The Yemeni Foreign Ministry said it had summoned its ambassador, Abdullah al-Deais, for consultation because of the comments made by Kordahi on the conflict in Yemen, according to a statement cited by the Yemeni official news agency, SABA. The statement noted that al-Deais had delivered a letter from his government to the Lebanese Foreign Ministry on Wednesday about Kordahi's comments about the situation in the desert country.

"The government and people of Yemen will continue to confront the Iranian project and its militias, and will be the safety valve for the Arab peninsula and the region in general," the statement added, according to Anadolu Agency (AA).

Prior to the Yemeni move, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Bahrain recalled their ambassadors in protest of Kordahi's comments about the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen in a televised interview said to be recorded before he took his post in the new Cabinet of Prime Minister Najib Mikati.

Asked if he "thinks that the Houthis, like Hezbollah, are defending their land as an armed organization," Kordahi responded: "Of course they are defending themselves... My personal opinion is that this war in Yemen needs to end. Houses, buildings, villages, and cities are being attacked by fighter jets."

Kordahi said last week that he has no intention to apologize for his comments or resign but confirmed he is committed to the Lebanese government program and policies.

Bahrain on Tuesday urged its citizens in Lebanon to immediately leave, after the UAE made a similar call. Bahrain's Foreign Ministry "urged all citizens in Lebanon to leave immediately, following the tense situation there, which calls for extra caution," it said in a statement carried by the official Bahrain News Agency.

On Monday, Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati said that his country was facing a "downhill slope" in its growing diplomatic row with Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. The GCC is a six-member regional body comprised of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, the UAE, Oman and Qatar.

Mikati said, "We face a downhill slope and if we don't avoid it, we will end up where nobody wants us to," the pro-Iranian Beirut-based Al-Mayadeen TV channel reported him as saying. Mikati also urged Kordahi, who made the comments, to "put his patriotic sense above all else" to defuse the crisis with Saudi Arabia.

The diplomatic row between Lebanon and Saudi Arabia is aggravating divisions in Lebanon, already reeling from an economic meltdown and its own social tensions. Some are pushing for the resignation of the Cabinet minister whose comments sparked the crisis, in order to protect economic and political ties with the Gulf. Others are defending him, describing calls for his removal as extortion.

The crisis comes at a tough time for Lebanon, as it grapples with rising poverty and unemployment, the fallout from some of the worst violence in Beirut in years and calls for major reforms from a divided but entrenched political elite. Many blame the country's leadership for years of corruption and mismanagement.

Yemen has been engulfed by violence and instability since 2014, when Iran-aligned Houthi rebels captured much of the country, including the capital, Sanaa. A Saudi-led coalition aimed at reinstating the Yemeni government has worsened the situation and caused one of the world’s worst man-made humanitarian crises.


_________________________

Correct me if I remember wrongly, but didn't Lebanons minister make remarks on KSA attacks on Yemen and that they should stop it....
 

Lool

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Correct me if I remember wrongly, but didn't Lebanons minister make remarks on KSA attacks on Yemen and that they should stop it....
Yes you are right
He said that KSA's intervention in Yemen is inhumane etc.... and that they should leave
What is happening in Yemen is quite sad; KSA wants to invade Yemen to have access to Yemen's oil in addition to a new oil shipping route and evade Iran's threats in the Gulf sea. The Iranians do know that and are pressuring KSA from performing such acts by using the Houthis
While the UAE wants to divide Yemen into 3 different states
 

emrachi

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Do you think Turkish troops could fight a war in that terrain well or not?
The main issue here seems implementing wrong tactic and strategies by Saudi army, you have these irregular unconventional guerilla fighters who probably have excellent knowledge of the terrian , they are able to adapt and survive in this enviroment and terrain. They move in groups freely and pick targets at their own initiaves while Saudi soldiers stationed at some outpost have no where to hide are expected to defend that outpost and surroundings which is impossible, they are sitting ducks right there waiting to be finished off.

The solution here is you need some couple of tens of thousand commando's who are trained unconventional anti-guerilla warfare separeted into groups of 100/120 and they need to be constantly on the move their only objective must be (search&destroy) no outpost, no guarding anything, just move in the nights and hunt them down. They must be trained to live and survive the area just like the houthis.

Meanwhile intelligence and CAS is also important.

And finally i am not sure about 10/20 years ago but current Turkish armed forces are able to effectively deal with this problem without much trouble.
 
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Saithan

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Blasts near Abu Dhabi airport, oil facility kill 3, Houthis claim drone attack​

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS​

DUBAI JAN 17, 2022 - 2:30 PM GMT+3

A general view of the Abu Dhabi skyline, UAE, Dec. 15, 2009. (Reuters Photo)
A general view of the Abu Dhabi skyline, UAE, Dec. 15, 2009. (Reuters Photo)


An explosion that hit three fuel tankers in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) capital Abu Dhabi and another fire near the city's bust international airport might have resulted from a drone attack launched by Yemen's Houthis.

The explosion killed three people and wounded six, Abu Dhabi police said, identifying the dead as two Indian nationals and one Pakistani. It did not identify the wounded, who police said suffered minor or moderate wounds. Police said an investigation was underway.

While Abu Dhabi police did not immediately offer any suspects for the possible assault, Yemen’s Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for an attack targeting the United Arab Emirates, without elaborating. The Iranian-backed Houthis have claimed several attacks that Emirati officials later denied took place.

The incident comes while Yemen’s yearslong war rages on and as an Emirati-flagged vessel found itself recently captured by the Houthis. That’s as Abu Dhabi largely has withdrawn its national forces from the conflict tearing apart the Arab world’s poorest nation while still supporting local militias there.

Abu Dhabi police said preliminary investigations indicated the detection of small flying objects, possibly belonging to drones, that fell in the two areas and may have caused the explosion and fire. They said there was no significant damage from the incidents, without offering further details.

Police described the airport fire as "minor” and said it took place at an extension of the international airport that is still under construction. For years, the airport home to Etihad Airways has been building its new Midfield Terminal, but it wasn't clear if that was where the fire took place.

The airport and Etihad did not immediately respond to requests for comment; however, there were a series of flights delayed Monday morning.

Police said the other blast struck three petroleum transport tankers near a storage facility for the Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. in the Musaffah area. The neighborhood, 22 kilometers (13 miles) from the center of Abu Dhabi city, also has an oil pipeline network and 36 storage tanks, from which transport trucks carry fuel nationwide.

On Monday, Houthi military spokesperson Yahia Sarei said the group launched an attack deep in the UAE. He did not provide further details, saying a statement would be released soon.

The location of the ADNOC storage facility where the tankers caught fire is approximately 1,800 kilometers (1,100 miles) northeast of Saada, the Houthis’ stronghold in Yemen.

The UAE has been at war in Yemen since early 2015 and was a key member of the Saudi-led coalition that launched attacks against the Iranian-backed Houthis after the group overran the capital of Yemen and ousted the internationally backed government from power.

Although the UAE has decreased the number of troops it has on the ground, it continues to be actively engaged in the war and supports key militias fighting the Houthis. It also cooperates closely with the United States in counterterrorism operations in Yemen.

The Houthis have come under pressure in recent weeks and are suffering heavy losses as Yemeni forces, allied and backed by the UAE, have pushed back the rebel group in key southern and central provinces of the country.

Yemen’s government-aligned forces, aided by the UAE-backed Giants Brigades and with help from Saudi airstrikes, reclaimed the entire southern province of Shabwa from the Houthis earlier this month and made advances in nearby Marib province.

The incident comes as South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in visits the UAE. During the president’s meeting with Emirati Prime Minister and Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum on Sunday, the two countries reportedly reached a preliminary deal valued at some $3.5 billion to sell mid-range South Korean surface-to-air missiles to the UAE.

In July 2018, the UAE denied reports that the Houthis attacked Abu Dhabi airport with a drone. A month later, Dubai International Airport said it was operating as normal after Houthi-run media said the group launched a drone attack there. In December 2017, the Houthis said they fired a cruise missile toward a nuclear power plant in Abu Dhabi, which Emirati authorities denied.

The Houthis have used bomb-laden drones to launch crude and imprecise attacks aimed at Saudi Arabia and the UAE over the course of the war. The group has also launched missiles at Saudi airports, oil facilities and pipelines, as well as used booby-trapped boats for attacks in key shipping routes.

Though there have been civilian deaths in Saudi Arabia from some of these attacks, the overwhelming number of civilian deaths have been in Yemen. The war has killed 130,000 people in Yemen – both civilians and fighters – and has exacerbated hunger and famine across the impoverished country.

Torbjorn Soltvedt, an analyst at the risk intelligence company Verisk Maplecroft, noted that while suspicion likely would fall on the Houthis, Iraqi-based militias also have threatened the Emiratis with attacks.

"Today’s attack comes only days after Iran-backed groups threatened to strike against Abu Dhabi in response to alleged Emirati interference in Iraqi politics,” he said.
"The attack is another reminder of the highly complex missile and drone threat faced by the UAE and the region’s other main oil producers,” he added. "Unless the Gulf Cooperation Council states can find a solution to defuse regional tensions, or deter hostility from regional state and non-state actors, they will remain vulnerable to attacks.”

 

Knowledgeseeker

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This thread should be more active. Alot of stuff happening in yemen!
 

Kara Khan

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Striking Houthis from above won't solve the problem, everyone have been doing it for years. What it takes to defeat them is to send there a big competent ground force and fight face to face. Unfortunately KSA and UAE forces are not competent, neither all the forces they paid to fight for them.
 
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