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Bogeyman 

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China tells US to stop going in 'wrong direction' after more lawmakers visit Taiwan​


The US "should stop going further down the wrong direction" after a second group of American lawmakers arrived in Taiwan, Beijing's UN envoy warned on Monday.

The delegation of US lawmakers arrived in Taiwan on Sunday evening on a two-day visit that is likely to further escalate US-Sino tensions after China reacted with fury to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit earlier this month.

In response to Pelosi's visit, Beijing launched large-scale military drills near Taiwan, and drew down cooperation with the US on military-to-military contacts and climate change.

"The whole world is seeing clearly who is provoking, who is changing the status quo, and who is trying to create troubles in that part of the world," Zhang Jun told reporters at the UN's New York headquarters.

"And for China, definitely, we will continue to do whatever we can to defend our sovereignty and territorial integrity. It shows also clearly that the countermeasures we have taken in response to such provocative acts are justified, are legitimate," he added.

The ongoing congressional visit is being led by Senator Ed Markey, and includes four lawmakers from the House of Representatives.

The delegation met Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen early on Monday as the two sides have reportedly discussed cooperation on security and supply chains. Joseph Wu, the Taiwanese foreign minister, also hosted the delegation.

Ties between Washington and Beijing have frayed significantly in recent weeks following Pelosi's visit to Taiwan, which was conducted in spite of repeated warnings from China. China views the trip as a threat to its claims of sovereignty over the island, which has ruled itself since 1949.

China views Taiwan as a "breakaway province," and has vowed to reunify it, including by force if necessary.

China concluded last week its over one-week massive military exercises surrounding Taiwan that included missile launches and mass deployments of ships and aircraft.

Apart from the show of military might, Beijing has downgraded military dialogue with the US and suspended cooperation on climate change issues, along with six other countermeasures.
 

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U.S. warships transit Taiwan Strait, first since Pelosi visit​



Two U.S. Navy warships sailed through international waters in the Taiwan Strait on Sunday, the first such operation since a visit to Taiwan by U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi enraged China which regards the island as its territory.

The U.S. Navy, confirming a Reuters report, said cruisers Chancellorsville and Antietam were carrying out the ongoing operation. Such operations usually take eight to 12 hours to complete and are closely monitored by China's military.

In recent years, U.S. warships, and on occasion those from allied nations such as Britain and Canada, have routinely sailed through the strait, drawing the ire of China which claims Taiwan against the objections of its democratically elected government.

Pelosi's Taiwan trip in early August infuriated China which saw it as a U.S. attempt to interfere in its internal affairs. China subsequently launched military drills near the island which have since continued.

"These (U.S.) ships transited through a corridor in the strait that is beyond the territorial sea of any coastal state," the U.S. Navy said.

The operation demonstrates the United States' commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific, and the U.S. military flies, sails and operates anywhere international law allows, the Navy said.

John Kirby, a spokesperson for the U.S. National Security Council, echoed that position on CNN, saying the ships' passage was "very consistent" with the U.S. "one-China" policy and of seeking "a free and open Indo-Pacific."

Kirby added that the operation was planned long ago.

The Chinese military's Eastern Theater Command said it was following the ships and warning them.

"Troops in the theater remain on high alert and are ready to thwart any provocation at any time," it added in a statement.

Taiwan's defense ministry said the ships were sailing in a southerly direction and that its forces were observing but that "the situation was as normal".

The narrow Taiwan Strait has been a frequent source of military tension since the defeated Republic of China government fled to Taiwan in 1949 after losing a civil war with the communists, who established the People's Republic of China.

Pelosi's visit to Taiwan was followed around a week later by a group of five other U.S. lawmakers, with China's military responding by carrying out more exercises near the island.

Senator Marsha Blackburn, a U.S. lawmaker on the Senate Commerce and Armed Services committees, arrived in Taiwan on Thursday on the third visit by a U.S. dignitary this month, defying pressure from China to halt the trips. read more

The administration of U.S. President Joe Biden has sought to keep tension between Washington and Beijing from boiling over into conflict, reiterating that congressional trips are routine.

The United States has no formal diplomatic relations with Taiwan but is bound by law to provide the island with the means to defend itself.

China has never ruled out using force to bring Taiwan under its control.

Taiwan says the People's Republic of China has never ruled the island and so has no claim to it, and that only Taiwan's 23 million people can decide their future.
 

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Japan will most likely take part if Taiwan Strait conflict breaks out​


Vice president of Japan's ruling party says Japanese islands could see combat in cross-strait conflict​

4576

By Kelvin Chen, Taiwan News, Staff Writer
2022/09/01 17:45
[IMG alt="Aso Taro, vice president of Japan's ruling party.
"]https://tnimage.s3.hicloud.net.tw/photos/2019/10/18/1571383182-5da9678ea32d3.jpg[/IMG]
Aso Taro, vice president of Japan's ruling party. (AP photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — If Taiwan is dragged into a cross-strait conflict, Japan is likely to join, Aso Taro, vice president of Japan's ruling Liberal Democratic Party, said on Wednesday (Aug. 31).

Speaking at a Liberal Democratic Party seminar in Yokohama, Aso said that if Taiwan responds to a Chinese attack, it is likely that Yonaguni Island in Okinawa Prefecture and Yoronjima Island in Kagoshima Prefecture will become combat zones and there is a high possibility of war in these areas, according to The Nikkei.

At least in the East China Sea, the South China Sea, and the Taiwan Strait, there will definitely be fighting, he said.
During a fundraising party in July, Aso said, "If a major problem took place in Taiwan, it would not be too much to say that it could relate to a survival-threatening situation (for Japan)," according to Kyodo News.


Last year, he pointed out that a “crisis situation" refers to a country with close ties to Japan being attacked by force, thereby forming a "dangerous state that threatens the survival of the Japanese nation and clearly and fundamentally subverts the lives and rights of its citizens," per CNA.

 

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Taiwan shoots down drone off Chinese coast for first time​

Action near islet comes after Taipei vowed to take tough measures to deal with increase in such intrusions
The drone entered restricted airspace over Lion Islet (pictured), also known as Shiyu Islet

The drone entered restricted airspace over Lion Islet (pictured), also known as Shiyu Islet. Photograph: Carl Court/Getty Images

Reuters in Taipei
Thu 1 Sep 2022 08.52 BST


Taiwan’s military has shot down for the first time an unidentified civilian drone that entered its airspace near an islet off the Chinese coast, after the government vowed to take tough measures to deal with an increase in such intrusions.
Beijing, which claims Taiwan as its own against the objections of the Taipei government, has held military exercises around the island since early last month in reaction to a visit to Taipei by the US House of Representatives speaker, Nancy Pelosi.

Taiwan’s government has said it will not provoke or escalate tensions but has been particularly angered recently by repeated cases of Chinese drones buzzing islands controlled by Taiwan close to China’s coast.
The defence command for Kinmen, a group of Taiwan-controlled islands opposite the Chinese cities Xiamen and Quanzhou, said in a statement released by Taiwan’s defence ministry that the drone entered restricted airspace over Lion Islet just after midday local time (0500 BST).

 

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Typhoons around Taiwan resulted in Japanese coast guard vessels taking refuge in the Taiwan Strait. It is said that the waves are 4 meters long.


I think all the Japanese coast guard ships have escaped into the Taiwan Strait.
 

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The whole world was taken by a surprise when Chinese reacted strongly to Speaker Nancy Pelosi visit to Taiwan in July this year. President Xi ordered his airforce, navy and marines to stay in readiness to move into Taiwan at short notice. We were looking forward for some fireworks in Taiwan Straits but nothing happened. Cool heads prevailed in Peking and they decided to tone down the rhetoric to protest and anger. Fundamental reasons for Chinese retreat was that Taiwan armed forces are technologically at a better level and if Taiwan could keep Chinese at bay for a week or a bit more then US help will arrive. That will make any Chinese adventure become misadventure and a great loss of prestige for the Chinese. Hence realizing that intimidation is better than actual fight, Chinese withdrew. Now this tactic will never be repeated by the Chinese for a while.

Although quietly but the US commercial import interest and supply chain politics from China were holding their breath when the Chinese were making noises to shoot down the plane carrying Nancy Pelosi. They could never locate the flight as their identification system is far inferior. But, what if they had located the plane and shot it down. Then US would have forgotten about Russo-Ukrainian war and concentrated in the China Sea. The result would have been complete destruction of the new Chinese Navy and Airforce. That would have been the end of the Chinese big power status. Aren‘t they lucky that nothing untoward happened.

The moral of the whole story is that …. For Chinese do not let your ambitions of dominating world power take over your mindset. It may prove to be fatal. In the same breath, withdraw your land and sea claims over Japan, Vietnam, Philippines, India etc. Friendly relations will give better returns than claims and war.
 

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Long before any war with China can come the USA would have to completely sanction and embargo China. As long as they do business together everything is just smoke and mirrors.

The political hostility is good business for both sides. The americans keep the illusion up to their people that there is always a threat out there in the wider world that they must be worried about, while the Chinese get to convince their people that the evil westerner is the enemy, not their inhumane communist slave system. But white man is the enemy.

Meanwhile the billionaire class on both sides continue to make a killing.

If i'm a billionaire from the west and i think a war between china and the usa was a real possibility, i'm not investing in china and i'm taking all my investments out yesterday. They are not doing that.
 

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The United States cannot simultaneously send weapons to Greece, Ukraine and Taiwan and enter a hybrid or direct war. They still haven't started a production mobilization. It's just a time that works against them. So take the with a pinch of salt US claim that we will go to war if the Russians use nuclear weapons or if China invades Taiwan. Because today, the USA does not have the strength to stand behind its claims.
 

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The U.S. Isn’t Ready to Face China on the Battlefield​


The Biden administration is doubling down on its recognition of China as America’s main competitor. The recently released National Security Strategy and the soon-to-be-released National Defense Strategy—Congress has already received a version of the latter—conclude that China poses the most significant threat to the U.S. What administration officials haven’t said, however, is that the U.S. isn’t fully prepared to fight a major war against China.

The war in Ukraine has exposed deficiencies in America’s defense industrial base that could jeopardize the ability to fight a war with China. The capabilities for fighting are also essential for deterring China. Washington’s assistance to Ukraine has depleted U.S. stocks of some weapons systems and munitions, such as Stinger surface-to-air missile systems, M777 howitzers, 155mm ammunition, and Javelin antitank missile systems.

These challenges highlight an even more serious concern: The U.S. defense industrial base is inadequately prepared for the wartime environment that now exists. It is operating in a peacetime environment. In a major regional conflict—such as a war with China in the Taiwan Strait—U.S. munitions needs likely would exceed Pentagon plans and stockpiles.

In nearly two dozen iterations of a Center for Strategic and International Studies war game that examined a U.S.-China war in the Taiwan Strait, the U.S. expended all its joint air-to-surface standoff missiles and long-range precision-guided antiship missiles within the first week of the conflict. These missiles are critical because of their ability to strike Chinese naval forces from outside Chinese defenses.

The U.S. is not the only country facing this challenge. In a recent war game involving U.S., U.K. and French forces, the U.K.’s Third Division exhausted national stockpiles of critical munitions in just over a week.
Solving these problems will take time.

Defense companies are generally unwilling to take financial risks without contracts in place, including multiyear contracts. While the U.S. Defense Department signs multiyear contracts for ships and airplanes, it generally does not sign multiyear contracts for munitions. This risk aversion is compounded if companies have to make additional capital investments, especially brick-and-mortar ones.

There are also workforce and supply-chain constraints on increased demand for weapons systems and munitions required for one or more major wars. Companies need to hire, train, and retain workers. Supply chains for the U.S. defense sector are also not as secure as they should be, with some businesses shutting down or moving supply chains overseas—sometimes to unfriendly countries.

In other cases, there aren’t alternative sources for key weapons systems and munitions. The Javelin, for instance, relies on a rocket motor without a major secondary option. There are also significant vulnerabilities with some rare-earth metals, on which China has a near monopoly; other elements such as titanium and aluminum; semiconductors and other microelectronics.

Finally, time is a major constraint. It can take roughly two years to produce some types of missiles and systems, such as the Patriot Advanced Capability PAC-2/PAC-3 air- and missile-defense system, Tomahawk V, air-launched cruise missile, and long-range precision strike missile. These lead times are generally to deliver the first missiles—not the last ones. Filling inventories requires sustained multiyear investment. Brick-and-mortar investments for factories take even longer.

These challenges don’t have quick or easy solutions. That means we have to begin now. One step is for the Pentagon to reassess total munition requirements for one or more major wars. This might include modeling the expenditure rates of critical guided munitions among land, naval and air forces in a major conflict at various levels of intensity.

The Pentagon also needs to focus on targeted investments in key munitions and weapons systems, such as long-range precision strike and integrated air and missile defenses. These investments should include signing multiyear contracts.

During World War II, U.S. and allied defense industrial production was essential to defeating both Germany and Japan. But it didn’t happen overnight. If the U.S. is serious about competing with China, it needs to put its money where its mouth is. The defense industrial base is a critical place to start.

 

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