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Nilgiri

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One particular reason why Pakistan should be milked to eternity using FATF. They would have eveb given back bin laden if squeezed enough. The world s finally beginning to make stuff work in Pakistan.
I would like IK to come back to power and shamelessly beg US for another phone call from Biden, though I am surprised Pakistan is not even able to convince an person like Joe.

The hard truth is that this is the much higher leverage US enjoys on Pakistan compared to India.

American citizens died in the 26/11 terror attacks.....which is why/how the FBI got involved.

Pakistan's actions within AFG (at detriment to US forces) and then of course OBL/Abbotabad sanctuary further entrenched this grave distrust and near institutional antipathy US has with Pakistan right now (and further augmented by increasing importance of US relations with India).

But consider that no American citizens died in mumbai bombing of 93.....and thus dawood ibrahim doesn't get on "FBI wanted list" etc..... so he lives this long in the same denial purgatory (in some clifton residence iirc) that this Sajid Mir formerly did.

It is time and tested policy basically by Pakistan, world knows it.....all that varies is nature of relationship with this country in having some reason to overlook it and even embolden it.
 

Nilgiri

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Pakistani teenager Afsheen Gul suffered from a rare condition that kept her neck at 90 degrees. She struggled to access the right treatment until her case was brought to a doctor in India. BBC Urdu's Riaz Sohail reports on the teen's journey to getting life-saving treatment in Delhi.

What is a friend?
For most children, it's their classmates at school or neighbours they grew up with who became their friends. Sometimes, it's their favourite stuffed toy or perhaps even a pet.

But for 13-year-old Afsheen Gul from Pakistan's Sindh province, life had been a little different. The youngest of seven siblings, she never went to school or played with her friends.

That's because an accident - she fell from her sister's arm when she was just 10 months old - left her neck bent at 90 degrees. Her parents took her to the doctor who gave her some medicines and put a belt around her neck for support, but her condition only worsened.

"She could not walk, eat or talk. She used to just lie on the ground and we used to help her with everything," Afsheen's mother Jamilan Bibi recalls, adding that they could not afford further treatment.

Afsheen also suffers from cerebral palsy - she learned to walk when she was six, to speak when she was eight - which further pushed her behind other children her age.

For 12 years, Afsheen spent her life confined to her house in Mithi, nearly 300km (186 miles) from Karachi city, in this painful condition.

Afsheen seen with Dr Krishnan and her brother Yaqoob


IMAGE SOURCE,AFSHEEN GUL/INSTGRAM
Image caption,
Afsheen was successfully treated by Dr Rajagopalan Krishnan (left) in Delhi


However, her life changed in March when an Indian doctor successfully operated upon her curved neck. Dr Rajagopalan Krishnan, a specialist of complex spinal surgeries at the Apollo Hospital in Delhi, offered to do Afsheen's surgery free of charge.

Four months on, Afsheen can finally walk, talk and eat on her own. The wounds of her surgery have healed. Dr Krishnan checks on her via Skype every week.
"She is a little weak - and is still unable to go to school - but the doctor says that will get better with time," Afsheen's brother Yaqoob Kumbar says.
"We are so happy - the doctor saved my sister's life. For us he is an angel," Mr Kumbar says.

Afsheen suffers from atlanto-axial rotatory dislocation, a rotation of the spine which causes neck impairment. "This is probably the first case of its kind in the world," Dr Krishnan said.

Her condition gained worldwide attention in 2017, when an article on a news website spotlighted her story.

Prominent Pakistani actor Ahsan Khan shared a photo of Afsheen on Facebook, urging people to help, while Afsheen's mother was invited to a popular morning show hosted by Sanam Baloch. An online fundraiser was also created by an organiser in the US to help her family afford surgery.

In November 2017, Naz Baloch, an MP from the ruling Pakistan People's Party (PPP), tweeted that the Sindh government would provide complete treatment to Afsheen.

She was hospitalised in Agha Khan University Hospital - Pakistan's biggest private hospital - in Karachi in February 2018, where specialists said they would operate on her, but gave her a "50% chance of survival", Mr Kumbar says.

Afsheen's parents asked the doctors for time to think over it and took her home. "But we got busy with my sister's wedding and her treatment could not be completed," her brother says.

Mr Kumbar adds that after the wedding, the family contacted government officials to resume Afsheen's treatment but were allegedly disappointed when they did not receive a positive response.

Ms Baloch, however, says she tried her best to arrange Afsheen's treatment, including getting in touch with NGOs abroad, and only withdrew when international NGOs stepped in to help the family.

Afsheen was back in the news in 2019 when a British journalist, Alexandria Thomas, reported on her condition and her family's financial position.

Ms Thomas also put the family in touch with Dr Krishnan in Delhi, who spoke to Mr Kumbar and told him that he was willing to help Afsheen.

The family applied for visa on medical grounds and arrived in India in November last year. An independent childcare organisation, Darul Sukoon, helped them with the process.

Afsheen Gul seen at the Delhi airport with her brother Yaqoob


IMAGE SOURCE,AFSHEEN GUL/INSTAGRAM
Image caption,
Afsheen arrived with her brother in Delhi last November


It was an extremely difficult time for Afsheen and her family, Mr Kumbar recalls: "Dr Krishnan told us that her heart or lungs may stop beating during the operation."
There were also financial troubles - Afsheen's family did not have the money to pay for her treatment. So they relied on the online fundraiser to meet the expenses.
But Dr Krishnan gave the family hope. Mr Kumbar says he had been in contact with several doctors during this period, but no one as "sensitive and kind " as him.
"Due to his efforts and supervision the operation was successful," he adds.

Afsheen underwent two major surgeries before the main neck surgery, which was followed by another major operation.

The main surgery took place in February. Dr Krishan told the BBC that he and his team attached Afsheen's skull to her spinal cord during a six-hour operation. The skull was then attached to the cervical spine using a stick and screws to keep the neck straight.

Afsheen and her brother on a video call with Dr Krishnan


IMAGE SOURCE,AFSHEEN GUL/INSTAGRAM
Image caption,
Dr Krishnan checks on Afsheen every week via Skype

After the surgery was successful, Dr Krishnan told reporters that Afsheen would not have lived for long without treatment.

But she is now "smiling and talking", Mr Kumbar said in July when he posted a picture of his smiling sister on Facebook a day before Eid.

There are some complications though - she's still slower than other children, many of whom often judge her for that, her brother says.
"But that will get better with time. For now, I am just happy my sister is alive and happy."
 

Jackdaws

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A day after Pakistan expressed its willingness to resume bilateral trade with India, which was suspended by the former Imran Khan government in August 2019, New Delhi has made it clear that it will not take such a step in terms of “normalisation of trade”. However, India is ready to extend humanitarian aid and assistance for the flood-hit areas of the neighbouring country, “based on the kind of request” that comes from Islamabad.

Resumption of two-way trade between India and Pakistan will “not happen” any time soon and certainly not before both decide to have normal diplomatic ties with the reinstatement of envoys in each country, official sources told ThePrint

Sources also said that just as the Narendra Modi government had stepped up cooperation during the peak of the Covid pandemic even as it hosted a virtual meeting of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC), it is willing to help Pakistan which is facing a humongous crisis owing to flash floods.

The unprecedented flash floods have ravaged several parts of Pakistan, killing thousands and causing damage to the tune of $10 billion.

India has said it is “open” to sending vegetables and other food items, as well as medicines and essential items to Pakistan, on a “case-to-case” basis depending on the “kind of request” that gets communicated from Islamabad to New Delhi, sources said.

As of now, no official request has been made by Pakistan to India to send food shipments there.

On Tuesday, Pakistan’s finance minister Miftah Ismail said that the Shehbaz Sharif government can “consider importing vegetables and other edible items from India” in the wake of the crisis situation there.

Following that, Prime Minister Narendra Modi expressed his sympathies to Pakistan and extended his condolences in a tweet.


Resumption of trade will have to be from Pakistan’s side

Sources also indicated that since it was Pakistan that had stopped trade with India, the decision to resume it will also have to happen from their side. The decision will have to be formally proposed to India, post which the government will take a call on whether or not to resume it.
 

Nilgiri

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That's exactly what China is doing and all western countries should follow suit




Well what they have going on with others should not preclude making the offer to help with physical goods.

I remember they sent some relief to Gujarat Earthquake, even though it was just 2 years or so after Kargil.

Its perfunctory stuff in the end, but I think its still somewhat important to keep going where possible while we wait out the very bad larger divide that has entrenched from a security and political standpoint.
 

Gessler

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Well what they have going on with others should not preclude making the offer to help with physical goods.

I remember they sent some relief to Gujarat Earthquake, even though it was just 2 years or so after Kargil.

Its perfunctory stuff in the end, but I think its still somewhat important to keep going where possible while we wait out the very bad larger divide that has entrenched from a security and political standpoint.

Providing aid (either side) is more about appearing to 3rd parties as the innocent victim who never instigates conflict and as being ever ready for peaceful cooperation and that the other side is solely responsible for the aggressive designs & transgressions that are creating the rift.

Classic realpolitik, that's all.


Application of the Principles of War Propaganda, nothing more:


Namely:

"We do not want war"
"The other side is solely responsible for war"

It will not stop simply because one side is going through a particularly difficult natural disaster. As someone who knows Pakistan way better than me (ZA Bhutto) very rightly side, the Pakistanis will be willing to even eat grass or go hungry, but will not renege from getting their Atomic bomb. The current events do not have the critical mass to force Pakistan from reneging on its long-term goal of opposing/destroying India. Because without that, Pakistan pretty much has no reason to exist and the decision makers there cannot allow that to happen regardless of domestic circumstances.
 

Jackdaws

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Providing aid (either side) is more about appearing to 3rd parties as the innocent victim who never instigates conflict and as being ever ready for peaceful cooperation and that the other side is solely responsible for the aggressive designs & transgressions that are creating the rift.

Classic realpolitik, that's all.


Application of the Principles of War Propaganda, nothing more:


Namely:

"We do not want war"
"The other side is solely responsible for war"

It will not stop simply because one side is going through a particularly difficult natural disaster. As someone who knows Pakistan way better than me (ZA Bhutto) very rightly side, the Pakistanis will be willing to even eat grass or go hungry, but will not renege from getting their Atomic bomb. The current events do not have the critical mass to force Pakistan from reneging on its long-term goal of opposing/destroying India. Because without that, Pakistan pretty much has no reason to exist and the decision makers there cannot allow that to happen regardless of domestic circumstances.
True. But the point is not what they will do or continue to do. The question is, what should we do?
 

Hari Sud

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What is going on in the US policy makers mind. On one hand they approve $450 million military aid to modernize Pakistani Airforce and approve $6.5 billion IMF loan together with $2.0 billion World Bank Loan and then come out and call Pakistan the most dangerous nuclear armed state.

That statement is neither friendly nor good for Pakistan diplomacy. Everybody knew that state of Pakistan when they approved the military aid but somehow were confused until some more inside information arrived that Nuclear Weapons with ease can fall into terrorist or Jihadi hands. Now they do not know how to proceed. Choices are few. They can withdraw aid offer or make it conditional to US inspecting the nuclear weapons in Pakistan more often than before or take away their ability to use by disabling the command or control etc. Whatever is needed to be done, should be done sooner than later.

Otherwise Iran like sanctions be imposed.

 

Jackdaws

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Was reading about Pak people burning and refusing to pay their electricity bills. So decided to check the exchange rate to the Indian rupee. 1 INR now gets you 3.71 Pkr. Is this the lowest it's ever been?
 

suryakiran

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Was reading about Pak people burning and refusing to pay their electricity bills. So decided to check the exchange rate to the Indian rupee. 1 INR now gets you 3.71 Pkr. Is this the lowest it's ever been?
Yes. And things have just started. Interest rate hikes will play havoc with their industry. Forget India. Forget Bangladesh. They will have to compete with SL henceforth.
 

Jackdaws

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Yes. And things have just started. Interest rate hikes will play havoc with their industry. Forget India. Forget Bangladesh. They will have to compete with SL henceforth.
Lanka has a small population and can rely on India to bail it out. It's population is less than that of NCR. It has a high level of literacy and is actually an excellent tourist destination - I was there a day before the lockdown was announced and had to cut my trip shot.

Pakistan has what - 250 million people? I hope they don't freaking descend into India as refugees.
 

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