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At Raytheon Technologies, we're accelerating ideas to solve some of the world's biggest challenges by bringing together the brightest, most innovative minds across aviation, space and defense.
We form an unrivaled company, with one team coming together across the globe to push the limits of known science and redefine how we connect and protect our world. We are advancing aviation, building smarter defense systems and creating innovations to take us deeper into space.

 

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Multi-domain operations: Helping militaries make better decisions faster​


For years, Paul Meyer’s job in the U.S. Air Force was to suppress enemy air defenses. To do that, he had to know where they were and what they were doing. And to do that, he and the pilot of his F-4 Phantom II had to get close enough to show up on their radars.


“My job was to play chicken – to put myself in that environment where I have to fire my missile before he fires his,” said Meyer, a retired weapon systems officer and now president of Department 22, the next-generation military technology arm of Raytheon Intelligence & Space, a Raytheon Technologies business.
Today, Meyer and many others at Raytheon Technologies are working in support of a massive U.S. Department of Defense initiative that would make such tactics a thing of the distant past. That effort, known as Joint All Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, aims to put intelligence from any sensor – on land, at sea, in the air or in space – in the hands of any military operator or commander who needs it.
JADC2 is a leading example of what’s known as multi-domain operations, the idea that military forces around the globe can operate faster, more collaboratively and more effectively by using commercial-style data networks that collect, process and distribute enormous volumes of information within seconds.
“Military departments today have limited data-sharing capabilities and latency challenges. Data is stovepiped across systems. It’s like a bunch of soda straws relaying information unilaterally to other assets, and it’s not widely and easily available to military commanders who are making mission-critical decisions,” Meyer said. “We’re solving for that by designing data-centric technologies that are interoperable and open to deliver the right data at the right time so military commanders can make the right decisions faster.”
Here’s how experts across Raytheon Technologies are bringing that idea to life.


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Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing 9 fly over several U.S. Navy ships in formation during Valiant Shield 2022, a training exercise where the U.S. armed services operated together across military domains. (U.S. Navy photo)

Multi-domain operations begins with sensing. Across the military domains, there are thousands of radars, electro-optical/infrared systems, sonars and other types of sensors all doing essentially the same thing: monitoring the environment and rapidly assessing the changes.


The key concept behind multi-domain operations is that changes in one of those environments can be useful to military operators in another – either as a warning, or as a cue to act.


The U.S. military demonstrated how this would work in June 2022 during a joint exercise called Valiant Shield off the coast of Guam. In that exercise, a converted Boeing 727 known as the Raytheon Intelligence & Space Multi-program Test Bed, or RMT, used a combination of radar and electronic intelligence sensors to detect and describe a simulated threat at sea.


Onboard processors synthesized the data in seconds, calculated a targeting response and passed it autonomously to the tactical platforms tasked with defeating the target. Doing that required sharing data among the RMT, along with a KC-135 aircraft, four U.S. Navy F/A-18 fighters and a command-and-control station on the U.S. mainland – all in an environment that simulated a highly contested battlespace.


In the near future, sensors will routinely do more than simply gather and pass on information. They’ll perform certain intelligence and targeting tasks on their own – functions that historically have taken place at large ground stations and required around-the-clock, long-distance connectivity.

“We are paving the way for autonomous, smart sensors at the leading edge today,” Meyer said. “The velocity and complexity of modern peer-to-peer conflict requires it.”

Connect​


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A KC-135 aircraft – a plane traditionally used for refueling bombers and tactical fighters – can double as a communications node to the joint force.

The Valiant Shield exercise showed the value of not only collecting vital information from across the military domains, but delivering that information in a timely way to the people and platforms in a position to respond. That requires a level and pace of networking never before seen in defense.


“You can sense something, but if you can’t send that data to the platform that’s going to act, you can’t execute the mission,” said Elaine Bitonti, vice president of JADC2 experimentation and demonstration at Collins Aerospace, a Raytheon Technologies business.


Making those connections requires open systems that use multiple types of waveforms and networks to communicate, even in highly contested environments. And in turn, making those networks suitable for many types of military users requires innovative ways to manage and secure data amid the rigors of battle.


Raytheon Technologies already has a strong presence in secure communications across the military services. Collins Aerospace provides jam-resistant advanced tactical data links that are critical to connecting sensor data to operators on the edge of the battlespace.


Raytheon Missiles & Defense, another Raytheon Technologies business, is working with research and development organizations across the military to use cutting-edge approaches such as software-defined apertures, intelligent information distribution and multi-level security – a way to ensure operators can access the right data on the right networks. Those methods would help link platforms and synchronize their actions across extremely long distances in contested environments.

Apart from protecting data against unauthorized access, a multi-domain operations network would also have to handle the complications of international forces operating collaboratively. If a navy knows, for example, that a swarm of low-flying UAVs is heading into a friendly force’s airspace, it has an obligation to tell them right away – but it might need to keep other details secret, such as the source of the information.


In multi-domain operations, that would be a job for what’s known as the intelligent gateway – an oracle of sorts with multiple levels of security that would take in information from many forces across many domains, but redistribute it only to the relevant users, and only in an appropriate amount of detail.


“Users don’t always need to know what platform collected it or why that platform was in the area. They just need to know there is a valid threat,” Bitonti said.


She oversees the testing of technologies that illustrate how the intelligent gateway would work. In a 2021 demonstration at Wright Air National Guard Base in Salt Lake City, for example, Collins Aerospace showed that a KC-135 aircraft – a plane traditionally used to refuel bombers and tactical fighters – can double as a communications node to bridge the joint force.


Using Collins technology including a cross-domain solution and an advanced tactical datalink mesh network, the KC-135 transmitted data such as images and positioning information, from multiple users, with different levels of classification. The technology also displayed that information on the aircraft's Real Time Information in the Cockpit system.

“Having something like the KC-135 that can extend the range and reach of the network is critical,” Bitonti said. “The KC-135 can be a bridge that enables wider dissemination of critical data, allowing commanders to make better decisions.”

Make sense​


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Raytheon Technologies is developing a prototype for the U.S. Army's Tactical Intelligence Targeting Access Node, or TITAN, ground station, which will find and track potential threats by quickly combing through immense amounts of sensor data.

Multi-domain operations systems will collect terabytes of data from thousands of sensors – some old, some new, and some that use proprietary data formats readable by only certain ground stations. Fusing all that data, interpreting it and converting it into actionable battlefield intel will be the work of artificial intelligence and machine learning.


One example of such a system is the Tactical Intelligence Targeting Access Node, or TITAN – a forward-deployed ground station that ingests and combines large and diverse data sets to find, track and render detailed 3-D visualizations of potential threats quickly.


“Before, it took hours to get targeting-quality accuracy for an entire image,” Meyer said. “Now we’re looking at real-time targeting-quality accuracy for every pixel.”


Raytheon Intelligence & Space has proposed the system to the U.S. Army in support of the service’s part of the JADC2 effort. The system is a collaboration of three businesses: RI&S, which has decades of experience in integrating complex systems; Collins Aerospace, which contributed its expertise in open-systems architecture – a key feature for the military’s desire for fast and efficient upgrades – and the AI software company C3.ai.


Artificial intelligence will bring more than speed, Meyer said – it will enable even single operators to work on a much larger scale.

That’s what happened when Raytheon BBN demonstrated a software system known as ARAKNID in a multinational exercise led by the U.S. Northern Command. In that exercise, the software evaluated scenarios, then suggested courses of action to a U.S. Air Force commander. Based on the commander’s choices, the software then assigned multiple assets, including several fighter jets, to respond – reducing the time it took to get them in the air and increasing their chances of a successful intercept.


“Today, there are several people per asset. We’re developing systems to invert that,” Meyer said. “In the future, there will be many assets per person. This increases the scale for operators to complete not just one, two or three courses of actions, but hundreds simultaneously.”

Act​


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Effectors – a term that encompasses missiles, mortars and non-kinetic weapons – have two main roles in multi-domain operations: to defeat targets and to create data of their own.

Everything up to here – the sensing, the connecting, the data analysis, leads to one question: What are you going to do about it?


The answer often includes effectors, a military term that encompasses missiles and mortars, lasers and high-powered microwaves, jammers, decoys and cyber responses – essentially, anything a military can deploy to cause a change in the target.


Multi-domain operations would allow forces to use those systems much more effectively and efficiently, said Thad Smith, director of customer requirements and capabilities for Raytheon Missiles & Defense.


“Effectors are the last element of that network – the last thing you want to use,” said Smith, a former U.S. Navy surface warfare officer. “That’s the purpose of the network – to be able to use as minimal number of effects downrange as possible against targets, so we can achieve the desired effect we want in that moment.”


One example, he said, is the potential for precision weapons to feed battle-damage assessments into the network. If a network-enabled weapon such as the StormBreaker smart weapon can report that it has destroyed an adversary airfield, he said, there’s no need to launch a second, or to deploy intelligence aircraft to confirm.


Networking sensors and effectors can also have a deterrent effect, he said, particularly the more the U.S. and its allies talk about how they’re developing capabilities in that area. If adversaries know forward-deployed aircraft can share information seamlessly with surface ships and ground forces, he said, “that’s a deterrent in itself.”

“Now they have to do the calculus,” he said. “They were going to operate in this region of the ocean. Now they can’t – that’s a keep-out region.”


Network-enabled effectors could even be used to gather intelligence on how adversaries operate, Smith said. If a naval force were planning an operation to the west, he said, they could first launch a volley of decoys to the east to study the adversary’s response.


“It’s this chess match you’re always playing. Every time an enemy makes a maneuver, it just moves pieces on that chessboard. It exposes their thought process and their response rate, and it helps me construct my decision timeline,” he said. “It either accelerates our response or gives us more time to think through options other than effects on target, which, frankly, is the goal. Nobody wants to use effects until they have to.”

 

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RTX conducts successful lab demonstration of EPACS power thermal management system for F-35​



PARIS, June 19, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- PARIS AIR SHOW -- RTX (NYSE: RTX) has conducted a successful lab test of its Enhanced Power and Cooling System (EPACS), developed by its Collins Aerospace business. EPACS is designed to support F-35 Block 4 modernization and future upgrades. The company anticipates EPACS will achieve Technology Readiness Level 6 in 2023 and be ready to begin an Engineering & Manufacturing Development program as early as 2024.


Through its more efficient thermodynamic cycle, EPACS provides significantly more cooling capacity to the platform and requires less energy from the engine, thus helping to unlock improved engine performance and durability. The system will deliver more than twice the current cooling capability to support additional growth beyond Block 4 and is expected to provide enough cooling capacity for the life of the aircraft. In addition, EPACS fits within the existing envelope and is intended to be compatible with all three F-35 variants.


Engineered to supply cooling, main engine start and emergency power functionality for the F-35, EPACS includes an air cycle system, electric power generator and controller from Collins along with an auxiliary power unit from Pratt & Whitney.


"By leveraging proven technologies already in service on commercial and military aircraft, EPACS is a mature system that will help maximize F-35 performance for decades to come," said Ira Grimmett, vice president, Environmental & Airframe Control Systems for Collins Aerospace. "Using our state-of-the-art test lab in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, we have begun demonstrating the system's capacity to deliver more than twice the current cooling capability, validating EPACS as the best solution for Block 4 and beyond. We are excited for the opportunity to work with Lockheed Martin and the Joint Program Office to bring this solution forward."

 
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Pratt & Whitney and Virginia Tech Pioneer Laser-Optical Thrust and Emissions Measurement for Gas Turbines​


-Completed successful demonstration of laser-optical measurement of turbofan thrust

-Developing in flight application for thrust and particulate emissions measurement

PARIS, June 19, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- PARIS AIR SHOW -- Pratt & Whitney and Virginia Tech today announced a pioneering new technology for calculating thrust using lasers to enable high fidelity measurement of key gas turbine engine parameters including velocity, temperature, and density. Known as Filtered Rayleigh Scattering for Thrust measurement (FRST), this new optical instrumentation technique offers significant advantages compared to traditional sensors and probes, which will support the development of more efficient engine core technologies and could enable the measurement of non-CO2 particulate emissions in flight.


Filtered Rayleigh Scattering for Thrust measurement (FRST) successfully demonstrated on a test engine at Pratt Whitney Center of Excellence at Virginia Tech.

Filtered Rayleigh Scattering for Thrust measurement (FRST) successfully demonstrated on a test engine at Pratt Whitney Center of Excellence at Virginia Tech.


"The ability to use lasers and optical sensors represents a major step forward in engine instrumentation technology and is testament to the longstanding collaboration within the Pratt & Whitney Center of Excellence at Virginia Tech," said Geoff Hunt, senior vice president, engineering and technology, Pratt & Whitney. "FRST provides a less intrusive and more cost-effective method for measuring a range of engine metrics. We see exciting potential for FRST to help advance gas turbine propulsion technologies, particularly involving smaller and more thermally efficient engine cores, which are key to our next generation military and sustainable commercial engines."

A patent-pending technology, FRST makes use of the ultraviolet light spectrum and relies on the principle that light scattering back from air molecules passing over a laser-illuminated area can provide information about the gas flow field, from which thrust can be derived. Applied to a turbofan engine, the light is provided by a laser beam directed across the turbine's gas path, while the resulting scatter is recorded by a high-performance camera and "filtered" for corruptions in the signal.

FRST optical instrumentation potentially eliminates the need for traditional sensors and probes, which can be difficult to install and cause flow blockage, particularly on smaller engine cores where space is limited. FRST also presents opportunities to measure non-CO2 particulate emissions, which could contribute to industry wide efforts to understand and mitigate the environmental impact of those emissions, particularly with regard to contrail formation.

"Though the principle of Rayleigh scattering has been known for centuries, Pratt & Whitney and Virginia Tech engineers have harnessed recent advancements in computing power, laser and camera technology to demonstrate the first successful application on a turbofan engine," said Todd Lowe, Professor of Aerospace Engineering at Virginia Tech. "As we work towards in-flight demonstrations of FRST, we expect the technology will have other applications in the development and certification of aircraft engines."

Pratt & Whitney and Virginia Tech's joint research team successfully measured engine thrust using FRST optical techniques on a research engine in a test stand at Virginia Tech recording similar accuracy to that of traditional sensors and probes. The teams are working towards flight testing the technology.

 

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RTX awarded $264 million US Navy modification contract to produce AIM-9X missiles​


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TUCSON, Ariz., June 19, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- RTX (NYSE: RTX) was awarded a $264 million modification to a production Lot 23 contract originally awarded in December 2022. Under the modification, Raytheon, an RTX business, will produce and deliver 571 AIM-9X SIDEWINDER missiles and associated parts for the U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, and foreign military sales customers.

"AIM-9X is the world's most advanced, combat-proven infrared missile, providing advanced capabilities to the U.S. and our international allies," said Kim Ernzen, president of Naval Power at Raytheon. "The weapon's versatility and inherent growth potential makes it a triple-threat missile offering an unmatched level of lethality and survivability to counter threats."

Included in the modification, Raytheon will also provide captive air training systems, containers, spare assets, and related kits and support equipment. The majority of work will be performed within the continental U.S. and is expected to be completed in August 2026.

 

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Pratt & Whitney on track to complete F135 Engine Core Upgrade preliminary design review and move into detailed design phase in early 2024​



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PARIS, June 19, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- PARIS AIR SHOW -- Pratt & Whitney, an RTX (NYSE: RTX) business, is on track to complete the F135 Engine Core Upgrade preliminary design review (PDR) and move into the detailed design phase in early 2024. To meet this timeline, the company has more than doubled the F135 ECU team from 200 to 500 people.

Pratt & Whitney on track to complete F135 Engine Core Upgrade preliminary design review and move into detailed design phase in early 2024

The PDR will focus on demonstrating that the design meets customer requirements with acceptable risk and that the design maturity is sufficient to enter the detailed design phase.

"This upgrade will provide the F135 what it needs to support the additional capabilities that will soon be introduced to the F-35 through the jet's Block 4 upgrade," said Jill Albertelli, president of Pratt & Whitney's Military Engines business.

Pratt & Whitney's F135 ECU preliminary design activities are funded by a $115 million contract awarded in December 2022 and additional funding provided in the FY23 Defense Appropriations bill. In March 2023, the Department of Defense chose to upgrade the F135 versus replace it with an entirely new engine. The decision was announced as part of President Biden's 2024 budget proposal.

"The Department of Defense is laser-focused on delivering National Defense Strategy priorities, while carefully managing costs," said Jen Latka, Pratt & Whitney's vice president for the F135 program. "The engine has delivered more than twice the amount of bleed flow required in the original specifications for years. An upgrade will give the engine the capabilities it needs to meet and exceed the F-35's growing requirements for power and thermal management while improving durability and restoring life to the engine."

The F135 ECU is the fastest, most cost-efficient, and lowest-risk path to beyond Block 4 capability for all global F-35 operators. It is optimized for all three F-35 variants and will yield $40 billion in lifecycle cost savings by avoiding disruptive and costly air vehicle changes and leveraging the current global sustainment infrastructure.

 

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RTX STEP-Tech demonstrator completes first engine run and electrical system integration test​



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PARIS, June 20, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- PARIS AIR SHOW -- RTX (NYSE: RTX) today announced significant progress by Pratt & Whitney and Collins Aerospace on advancing hybrid-electric propulsion through the Scalable Turboelectric Powertrain Technology (STEP-Tech) demonstrator, which completed its first engine run and electrical system integration test. As a modular and scalable demonstrator platform, STEP-Tech is intended for rapid prototyping of distributed propulsion concepts applicable to a wide range of next generation applications, including advanced air mobility vehicles, high-speed eVTOL and blended wing body aircraft.


"Hybrid-electric propulsion is a key part of RTX's roadmap for enabling more sustainable aviation, with the potential to enhance efficiency across many future aircraft applications, from advanced air mobility to regional aircraft and single-aisles," said Mark Russell, Chief Technology Officer, RTX. "Harnessing deep expertise from Pratt & Whitney, Collins Aerospace and Raytheon Technologies Research Center in the fields of both aircraft propulsion and electrical systems, RTX is leading the development of hybrid-electric technology through multiple demonstration programs, including STEP-Tech."


Conducted at the Raytheon Technologies Research Center in East Hartford, Connecticut, the successful test included the first run of STEP-Tech's turbogenerator loaded at partial power. This was followed by an electrical system test where the battery and supercapacitor energy storage systems were integrated with the high voltage distribution system. STEP-Tech will next progress testing to a full-power turbogenerator run and validation of the electric fans (propulsors) through the high voltage electrical system.

RTX is also advancing hybrid-electric propulsion as part of its hybrid-electric flight demonstrator program, supported by the governments of Canada and Quebec, and the Sustainable Water-Injecting Turbofan Comprising Hybrid-Electrics (SWITCH) consortium, supported by the European Union's Clean Aviation Joint Undertaking.


These demonstrator programs are part of a companywide strategy to develop a broad portfolio of sustainable aviation technologies, leveraging collaboration across RTX's business units and through wider industry and public-private partnerships. The strategy recognizes the importance of continually advancing aircraft efficiency and enabling wider use of Sustainable Aviation Fuels to support the industry's goal of achieving net-zero CO2 emissions for civil aviation by 2050.


 
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RTX developing 1MW generator under contract with the Air Force Research Laboratory​


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PARIS, June 20, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- PARIS AIR SHOW -- RTX (NYSE: RTX) is developing a 1 megawatt electric generator for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) as part of its Advanced Turbine Technologies for Affordable Mission-Capability program. The low-spool generator could have multiple applications for future manned and unmanned military platforms.


With the addition of advanced mission systems, avionics and high-energy weapons, the next generation of military aircraft will require more onboard electric power than ever before. In the future, this 1MW generator – developed by the company's Collins Aerospace business – could be used to power such systems safely and efficiently.


Applied another way, the generator could be paired with a fuel-burning engine in a hybrid-electric propulsion architecture. In this way, the generator could help increase fuel efficiency to maximize aircraft range, minimize aerial refueling needs and reduce carbon emissions.


The company aims to deliver hardware to the AFRL and test the generator to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5 in 2024 using The Grid, its advanced electric power systems lab slated to open later this year in Rockford, Illinois. RTX's Pratt & Whitney business is supporting the 1MW generator program by studying future engine integration opportunities.

"While future military aircraft continue to take shape, one thing we know is that these platforms will require electric power in the megawatt range," said Henry Brooks, president, Power & Controls for Collins Aerospace. "To that end, we're working with the AFRL to design a generator that will give our customers the onboard power they need and the flexibility to tailor its use for multiple potential applications."


The AFRL 1MW generator complements the MW-class motors Collins Aerospace is developing for the RTX hybrid-electric demonstrator programs, including the hybrid-electric flight demonstrator, led by Pratt & Whitney Canada, and the SWITCH project, supported by the European Union's Clean Aviation initiative. Taken together, the solutions support the company's overall strategy for delivering advanced electric power systems for the next generation of military and commercial aircraft.

 

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US Air Force awards RTX $1.15 billion for latest AMRAAM configuration


TUCSON, Ariz., June 20, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- RTX (NYSE: RTX) was awarded a $1.15 billion contract for AIM-120 D-3 and C-8 AMRAAM® missiles. This is the largest AMRAAM missile contract to date and the fifth production lot of the highly advanced missiles developed under the Form, Fit, Function Refresh, also known as F3R, which updates both the missile's hardware and allows for Agile software upgrades.


"We recognize AMRAAM is the most advanced, combat-proven missile, and we owe it to the warfighters to ensure they have the technology they need when they need it," said Paul Ferraro, president of Air Power for Raytheon. "Be it air-to-air or surface-to-air, AMRAAM continues its proud legacy with greater power and precision than ever before with this contract."


In addition to providing missiles to both the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy, the contract also supplies AMRAAM all-up-rounds and/or spares to 18 countries, including Ukraine, extending the production line for both the U.S. and Allied partners.


Under the F3R program, engineers used model-based systems engineering initiatives and other digital technologies to upgrade multiple circuit cards and other hardware in the guidance section of the missile and to re-host legacy software in the AIM-120 D-3 and AIM-120 C-8 AMRAAMs.


 

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RTX awarded $117.5 million by US Army for advanced targeting sensor systems


Next-generation targeting and surveillance sensor system will support Abrams tanks and future optionally manned fighting vehicles


MCKINNEY, Texas, July 5, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- RTX (NYSE: RTX) was awarded a $117.5 million contract by the U.S. Army for low-rate initial production of 3rd Generation Forward Looking Infrared (3GEN FLIR) B-Kit sensors.


The advanced targeting sensor systems enhance lethality, survivability and situational awareness in austere environments, providing combat overmatch for the Army's ground combat platforms.


"This technology supports the U.S. Army's modernization effort to ensure the force is ready to address near-peer competitors," said Torrey Cady, vice president, Electro-Optical (EO) & Infrared (IR) Solutions at Raytheon. "Our technological advancements in the sensors reduce latency and give military forces a critical battlefield edge by exceeding overall performance of prior generation systems."


Under the contract, RTX will deliver 3GEN FLIR B-Kit sensors for the United States Army's combat platforms, which includes the advanced Abrams Main Battle Tanks and an option for optionally manned fighting vehicles.


The 3GEN FLIR B-Kit is platform agnostic, delivering a common operating picture for future combat ground vehicles. It also provides significant standoff for target detection, recognition, and identification. The advanced sensors ensure high resolution imagery is delivered to the right people in any environment so they can make the right decisions.


RTX's dual-band infrared system creates high-resolution images that help military commanders see in the dead of night and adverse battlefield and weather conditions even at great distances to aid mission planning and execution.


Raytheon has delivered more than 25,000 second-generation FLIR sensors over the past 20 years and applied the lessons learned from 2GF development and production to the 3GEN FLIR sensor production.


The 3GEN FLIR B-Kit commonality across the battlefield supports affordability and sustainability goals of the Army. Cost savings and avoidance were achieved through a concerted government and industry partnership using rigorous application and adherence to systems engineering best practices.


 

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F-16 fires AIM-120D-3 for final flight test of newest AMRAAM variant



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TUCSON, Ariz., July 10, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Air Force and Raytheon, an RTX business, have successfully completed all developmental and operational testing of the AIM-120D-3, which concluded with an F-16 live-fire of the missile with production hardware and software.


"We are ramping AMRAAM production to a greater rate than ever before in the history of this program," said Paul Ferraro, president of Air Power at Raytheon. "With significantly increased functionality, performance and producibility, and the completion of the flight test program, we are ensuring warfighters can count on having the fifth generation of AMRAAM – and enough of them – in their arsenal."


The AIM-120D-3 is the most advanced variant of the AMRAAM missile developed under the Form, Fit, Function Refresh (F3R) program, which upgraded circuit cards in the guidance section of the missile and allows for continuous agile software improvements. The latest AMRAAM is capable of countering peer threats.


Developmental and operational test of the AIM-120D-3 included captive carry and live-fires from both U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force fourth and fifth generation platforms. The production ramp increases follow recent contracts, such as a $1.15 billion awarded in June 2023 and $972 million awarded in Sept 2022.


 
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Raytheon, Northrop Grumman Awarded Contract for Additional Hypersonic Weapon Advancements


Additional Flight Tests Offer Opportunity to Further Expand and Validate System Capabilities


TUCSON, Ariz., July 17, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon, an RTX (NYSE: RTX) business, in partnership with Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC), was awarded a follow-on contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to reduce risk for future air breathing hypersonic systems. Under the agreement, the Raytheon-led team will build and fly additional Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept (HAWC) flight vehicles.


"We applied learnings from each successful HAWC flight test to ensure that it is the most sophisticated system of its kind," said Colin Whelan, president of Advanced Technology for Raytheon. "Continuing this important program will expand our knowledge of hypersonic flight and allow us to deliver the critical capability our warfighters need."


The team will continue to apply data and lessons learned from earlier stages of the program to mature the operationally relevant weapon concept design. Mainly, the effort focuses on incorporating manufacturing improvements into the existing HAWC design and flight tests to expand its operating envelope while validating system performance models. The airframe and engine designs are closely aligned to the U.S. Air Force's Hypersonic Attack Cruise Missile (HACM) which will directly benefit from the continued advancements.


"The HAWC follow-on contract serves as an engine pathfinder program in our new production-ready Hypersonics Capability Center in Elkton, Maryland," said Dan Olson, general manager and vice president, weapons systems, Northrop Grumman. "Our factory of the future will seamlessly transition our validated propulsion system design into an operationally ready system to support further flight testing."


Raytheon and Northrop Grumman have been partners since 2013 and signed a teaming agreement in 2019 to develop, produce and integrate Northrop Grumman's scramjet engines onto Raytheon's air-breathing hypersonic weapons. In September 2022, the team was selected to develop HACM, a first-of-its-kind weapon. Additionally, the team has successfully completed multiple HAWC operational prototype system flight tests where digital engineering concepts, grounded in real-world flight data, have accurately predicted and increased system performance. Their combined efforts enable the production of air-breathing hypersonic weapons, the next generation of tactical missile systems.


 

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RTX Introduces Largest Form Factor in CubeSat Product Line


LAFAYETTE, Colo., Aug. 9, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- RTX's (NYSE: RTX) small satellite manufacturer and mission services provider, Blue Canyon Technologies (BCT), continues to meet the demand for increased payload size, weight, and power (SWaP) by introducing the XB16 CubeSat, now the largest form factor in its CubeSat product line.


The XB16 CubeSat offers 14U of payload volume with a cannister-dependent option for an additional 12,000 cubic centimeters of volume, all while maintaining BCT's robust power systems, secure data handling, resilient performance, and ultra-precise attitude control systems. The larger payload volume capacity of the XB16 provides an ideal solution for remote sensing, earth observation, and in-space communications.


"Our flight-proven products are known for their fine-pointing and agility on orbit," said John Carvo, executive director of CubeSats at Blue Canyon. "Now we are able to offer a larger payload volume with the same high level of accuracy and orbit lifetime."


This addition to the BCT array of peak-performance and cost-effective spacecraft solutions continues the company's ability to support all types of academic, commercial and government space missions.


The new XB16 will be developed at BCT's Spacecraft Manufacturing Center located in Boulder, CO. The office and laboratories are designed specifically for high-volume production of spacecraft systems and components, with the manufacturing capability to handle large constellations of small spacecraft.


 

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RTX to deliver 5G mobile ad hoc networks to the tactical edge



CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Aug. 24, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- RTX's (NYSE: RTX) BBN division will lead a team to create multi-hop mobile ad hoc networks, or MANETs, for the Department of Defense. The technology will allow forward-deployed service members with 5G equipment to communicate directly without the need for a complex 5G infrastructure.


The Opportunistic eXtemporarY 5G Encrypted Network (OXYGEN) capability is being developed under a contract with the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering's (OUSD (R&E)'s) FutureG and 5G Office with a potential value of $6.6 million over two years. It aims to connect a minimum of 20 pieces of user equipment by taking advantage of 5G's sidelink technology, while securely enabling the transmission of data at 100 Mbps.


"Our warfighters use existing infrastructure like roads and bridges when they're forward deployed now," said Dr. Daniel Massey, program lead for the FutureG & 5G Office's Operate Through team. "Why shouldn't we use existing communications infrastructure as well? Access to a 5G MANET allows us to move from single-digit megabit per second individual data sharing, for ground soldiers to 100 times more throughput, which will enable sharing more high-resolution video and imagery."


Piggybacking sensitive information over commercial infrastructure requires additional layers of security and mesh networking on top of relay links. This allows for multicast traffic instead of simple peer-to-peer communication.


"OXYGEN will enhance commercial cellular equipment to ensure a fully trusted and secure tactical MANET capability," said Chris Vander Valk, research engineer at Raytheon BBN. "We're using techniques like cryptographic scrambling, encryption of control and data traffic and secure memory compartmentalization to achieve this."


The Raytheon BBN-led team includes Kryptowire LLC, Novowi LLC and Curated Networks, Inc. Work on the program is being performed in Cambridge, Massachusetts; McLean, Virginia; Brookline, Massachusetts; and Santa Cruz, California.


 

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RTX receives DoD funding for GhostEye® MR radar development and experimentation


ARLINGTON, Va., Aug. 30, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon, an RTX business, has been awarded $7 million to advance development and assessment of the company's GhostEye® MR radar, an advanced medium-range sensor for the National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System, or NASAMS.

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These are the first government contracts for GhostEye MR, a multi-mission radar designed and developed by Raytheon via internal research and development investments. Funding will support continued radar development and then an operational assessment at White Sands Missile Range later this year.


"This government support confirms the growing relevance and demand for the capabilities of GhostEye MR, as nations around the globe look to bolster their air defense," said Tom Laliberty, president of Land & Air Defense Systems at Raytheon. "Partnering with DoD, Air Force, and Kongsberg, we will showcase the sensor's range of capabilities against a multitude of emerging threats."


The experiment at White Sands will assess the operational performance of GhostEye MR, with the radar providing effective surveillance cues and integrating with the combat-proven NASAMS air defense system. This follows the Strategic Developmental Planning & Experimentation (SDPE) office's successful air base air defense experiment in Andøya, Norway, last September, which showcased NASAMS' ability to engage and intercept various advanced aerial threats using multiple Raytheon missile types and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace's Fire Distribution Center, or FDC. The operational assessment in September will build upon the capabilities demonstrated in Andøya by utilizing the U.S. Air Force's relevant command and control to link GhostEye MR with NASAMS' FDC.


Funding consists of a contract from the U.S. Air Force Research Lab's SDPE office and the Office of the Secretary of Defense's Rapid Prototyping Program (RPP).


A member of Raytheon's GhostEye family of sensors, GhostEye MR is an advanced medium-range multi-mission radar for NASAMS. The radar, introduced in 2021, provides increased range and altitude coverage to expand the defended-area capabilities of NASAMS. Additionally, GhostEye MR leverages commonality with the Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS) that Raytheon is building for the U.S. Army.


 

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US Air Force, RTX complete first flight test of AIM-120C-8


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TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 1, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Air Force and Raytheon, an RTX (NYSE: RTX) business, successfully completed the first flight test of the AIM-120C-8 – the latest international variant of AMRAAM® developed under the Form, Fit, Function (F3R) refresh. The AIM-120C-8 was fired from an F-15C Eagle and downed the aerial target, meeting all primary objectives for the flight test.


"AMRAAM is a combat-proven missile trusted by more than 40 international partners for both air-to-air and surface-to-air missions," said Paul Ferraro, president of Air Power at Raytheon, an RTX business. "With the advancements from F3R, which updates both the missile's hardware and allows for future Agile software upgrades, we are maximizing the capabilities of this munition for allies around the world."


Under the F3R program, engineers used model-based systems engineering initiatives and other digital technologies to upgrade multiple circuit cards and advanced processors in the guidance section of the missile and to re-host legacy software in the AIM-120D-3 and AIM-120C-8 AMRAAMs.


This AIM-120C-8 flight test follows the completion of flight testing of the AIM-120D-3. Flight testing on the AIM-120D-3 was completed in just 11 months after the initial flight test and concluded with showcasing the success of the missile in a highly contested environment.


Recently, the U.S. Air Force awarded Raytheon a $1.15 billion AMRAAM contract to produce AIM-120D-3 and C-8 missiles for 19 countries.


 

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Poland becomes first international LTAMDS customer


KIELCE, Poland, Sept. 5, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- The Polish Minister of National Defense, Mariusz Błaszczak, approved a Letter of Acceptance with the U.S. Army to expand its WISŁA air and missile defense capabilities with the introduction of 12 Lower-Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensors, or LTAMDS, and the addition of 48 Patriot® launchers. The agreement sets the Foreign Military Sale into motion and makes Poland the first international customer to add the advanced 360-degree LTAMDS radar being built by Raytheon, an RTX business, to their air and missile defense architecture.


The acquisition supports the Polish Government's WISŁA Phase 2 program, building on the nearly completed first phase which culminated with the delivery and testing of four Patriot fire units. Raytheon completed its delivery of the last two fire units to Poland earlier this year and the systems will complete System Integration and Check-Out, or SICO, in October.


"Poland's expansion of its WISŁA program will fortify the country's security and defense against a range of air and missile threats," said Tom Laliberty, president of Land & Air Defense Systems at Raytheon. "With the introduction of LTAMDS, Poland will become the first country after the US to complement the combat-proven Patriot with LTAMDS which provides extended range and full, 360-degree coverage to detect and defend against complex, highly coordinated, multi-threat attack scenarios."


Raytheon's successful deliveries for WISŁA Phase 1 were due in large part to the collaborative partnerships with Polish industry. Nine Polish suppliers contributed various system elements and components to the Patriot system and are now part of Raytheon's Global Supply Chain. Participation will continue and expand with an offset program for Phase 2, including opportunities to support LTAMDS. Five Polish industry partners, all members of the PGZ group, will receive technology, equipment, and training to enable them to produce and maintain components of LTAMDS. It is envisioned they will become part of the LTAMDS global supply chain.


Patriot is the only combat-proven ground based air defense capability available in the world today to defeat advanced long-range cruise missiles, tactical ballistic missiles, and a full spectrum of air-breathing threats. It is the backbone of air defense for 19 countries.


LTAMDS is the next generation air and missile defense radar for the U.S. Army. A 360-degree, Active Electronically Scanned Array radar, powered by Raytheon-manufactured Gallium Nitride, LTAMDS provides dramatically more performance against the range of threats, from manned and unmanned aircraft to cruise missiles, ballistic missiles and hypersonics. Raytheon is advancing the development of LTAMDS for the U.S. Army, with all six radars under contract having completed production and are undergoing simultaneous testing at various government and Raytheon test sites, conducting integration and test activities in parallel.


 

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RTX to begin international deployment of ground-based Low Earth Orbit observation system


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The international deployment of RTX's ground-based Low Earth Orbit observation system, called LOCI, will enhance the company's space surveillance and tracking capabilities.



International deployment of LOCI enhances RTX's space surveillance and tracking capabilities

LONDON, Sept. 12, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon NORSS – Raytheon's UK-based space domain awareness specialist – announced today the international deployment of its Low Earth Orbit Optical Camera Installation, called LOCI, that was built and developed in the United Kingdom. Raytheon is an RTX (NYSE: RTX) business.


This ground-based space domain awareness sensor system is being deployed in the Sierra Mountains, California, in the United States and has been tailored to tackle the challenges of low-Earth orbit optical observation. LOCI provides critical observation data on objects in low-Earth orbit, including space debris, defence assets and commercial spacecraft.


"By deploying LOCI, we are expanding our existing sensor network internationally to improve our coverage and, ultimately, our awareness of what is occurring on orbit," explained Sean Goldsbrough, head of Raytheon NORSS. "These intelligently selected locations will increase the quantity and quality of data we're collecting and allow our customers deeper insights into what is happening with and around their assets of interest and the overall space environment."


The Sierra Mountains are an ideal location for deployment given their minimal light pollution and cloud coverage, allowing LOCI to capture high quality images with limited environmental interference. Further international locations are already under discussion as the Raytheon NORSS team looks to expand its capabilities in coming years.


"The space domain already shapes our way of life, and our ability to monitor and support assets in orbit is critical to ensuring space continues to yield the technological benefits we associate with it," Goldsbrough said. "With the global deployment of LOCI, a technology that places Raytheon at the forefront of space-based technologies, we can provide our partners with a more comprehensive picture of what is taking place in low Earth orbit".


LOCI was developed by Raytheon NORSS in Northumberland, UK using internal research and development funding.


 

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RTX delivers first B-52 AESA radar to Boeing


The new B-52 radar is based on AESA technologies developed from RTX's pioneering AN/APG-79 radar


EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Sept. 12, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon, an RTX (NYSE: RTX) business, delivered the first B-52 active electronically scanned array radar (AESA) to Boeing for the U.S. Air Force's B-52 Radar Modernization Program. This first radar will be used for system integration, verification, and testing.


"Outfitting the B-52 with an AESA radar replaces its current 1960s radar technology," says Michelle Styczynski, vice president of Agile Radar Solutions at Raytheon. "With an AESA radar on board, the B-52 will gain improved navigation and targeting capabilities in higher threat areas."


The B-52's new radar will enable improved mapping and detection range and increase the number of targets the platform can engage simultaneously. Along with improved modes and capabilities, the AESA radar will help crews see further, more accurately and have increased situational awareness.


"This new AESA radar will give the B-52 more capability than it has today and allow for the possibility to enhance access to growth capabilities in the future," said Jennifer Wong, senior director, Boeing Bomber Programs. "A lot of amazing collaboration by our Boeing team, Raytheon and the Air Force made this possible."


Under the contract, Raytheon is designing, developing, and producing the radar systems for the entire U.S. Air Force B-52 fleet. The advanced radar upgrade will ensure the aircraft remains relevant and mission ready through its lifetime.


Production of the radars is taking place in Forest, Mississippi and El Segundo, California. The remaining test-phase radars are expected to be delivered through the summer of 2024.


 

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Raytheon UK set to receive and integrate UK's first laser weapon system in October​


  • High-energy laser weapon system is operationally ready and will be integrated onto a Wolfhound military vehicle

LONDON, Sept. 13, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Raytheon UK is set to receive its first high-energy laser weapon system to be tested and integrated in the United Kingdom, marking a significant advancement in the understanding of how such systems can be fielded. Raytheon UK is the British unit of RTX's (NYSE: RTX) Raytheon business.


Designed to stop aerial threats such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), this 15-kilowatt laser is the latest development in the UK Ministry of Defence's Land Demonstrator programme. Raytheon UK was contracted in 2021 to develop and install the laser system on a UK Wolfhound armored vehicle.


"The arrival of this transformative technology is an important milestone in our collaboration with the MoD on using directed energy to address a variety of threats, from drones and UAVs to more complex missile systems," said Julie Finlayson-Odell, managing director of weapons and sensors at Raytheon UK. "This system is a culmination of decades of investment, research and innovation and its arrival reflects our continued commitment to help fulfil a key strategic objective of the UK's Integrated Review, which is to understand how directed energy weapons can safely and effectively operate alongside other elements of the UK's armed forces."


The high-energy laser weapon system has performed as designed in multiple field tests, including in difficult weather conditions with extreme heat, cold, rain, sleet and snow. During four days of live-fire exercises earlier this year in the United States, the system successfully acquired, tracked, targeted and destroyed dozens of drone targets in short-range attack, swarm attack and long-range threat scenarios.


Raytheon's high-energy laser weapon system is compact, portable, can be installed on a variety of platforms, and it easily connects to other air defence systems. With deep, rechargeable magazine and minimal logistics, this laser weapon is an affordable and viable option to protect military and critical infrastructure, and rapidly defeat threats. The system offers a nearly infinite number of shots and precision accuracy with very low collateral damage, making it an affordable alternative to traditional munitions.


Raytheon UK is building on the success of U.S. investment, where a total of eight high-energy laser weapons have been delivered to the U.S. military. These systems have defeated more than 400 targets over 25,000 operational hours.


Raytheon has developed the enabling technologies, as well as complete and customizable systems, that enable military and civilian customers to defeat complex UAS threats in any environment. The company has developed integrated, high-performing sensors and cost-effective kinetic and non-kinetic effectors to defeat threats more efficiently. This provides the ability to select the right effectors against a range of threats.


The delivery of the first system to the UK comes as Raytheon UK officially opens its new, advanced laser integration centre in Livingston, Scotland. The centre, first announced in July 2022, focuses on the testing, fielding and maintenance of Raytheon's defensive laser weapons and is a regional hub established to ensure that laser weapons can be quickly fielded, maintained and repaired.


 

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