Canada Air-Force RCAF Legacy Hornet replacement program

Nilgiri

Experienced member
Moderator
Aviation Specialist
Messages
9,444
Reactions
107 19,151
Nation of residence
Canada
Nation of origin
India
It has been a long story, earlier details which I might get into a bit later...but news/updates governing this will be archived here.

It is of increasing conclusive relevance in news cycle increasingly given fiscal pressure from covid downturn in economy.

The current contenders are the: F-35A, F/A-18 E/F Superhornet and Gripen.

Down-selection will commence next year, 1 or 2 contenders may be dropped by then.

Final selection is expected in 2022 and first aircraft deliveries in 2025.

I will pin this thread given its magnitude of importance to Canadian defence strategy to about 2050 and possibly beyond.
 

Nilgiri

Experienced member
Moderator
Aviation Specialist
Messages
9,444
Reactions
107 19,151
Nation of residence
Canada
Nation of origin
India

The Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II has long been considered the favourite to replace the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CF-188 Hornet. But in a competition now being contested in a weakened economy in which the government faces a ballooning deficit and an uncertain job market, how well each fighter jet scores on acquisition and sustainment costs and economic benefits to Canada – worth 40 per cent of the evaluation – could be almost as important as how well the aircraft meets the Air Force’s capability requirements

(more at link)
 

Test7

Experienced member
Staff member
Administrator
Messages
4,787
Reactions
19 19,929
Nation of residence
United States of America
Nation of origin
Turkey
Saab and the Consortium for Research and Innovation in Aerospace in Quebec (CRIAQ) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU).

1.jpg

This collaborative relationship aims to leverage Quebec's R&D ecosystem’s strengths to encourage the development of collaborative research projects between Saab and Canadian industry, as well as universities and research organizations.

This collaboration has been formed to support Saab’s future Industrial and Technological Benefit (ITB) commitments, if the Gripen fighter is selected for Canada’s Future Fighter Capability Project (FFCP).

“The quality and breadth of aerospace research and innovation in Canada is globally recognised, with the Quebec region home to many excellent companies and institutions. Therefore, it was natural to reach this agreement with an important organisation like CRIAQ. We look forward to working together to benefit research and the fostering of talent in Quebec,” said Jonas Hjelm, Senior Vice President and Saab’s Head of business area Aeronautics.

“During such unsure times within the industry, this partnership demonstrates that the aerospace industry in Quebec and Canada remains attractive and world class. We are very pleased with this signing as we continue to develop our aerospace industry, adding a new global player to our ecosystem. I am convinced that CRIAQ's academic, industrial and SME community, and the Quebec economy as well, will clearly benefit from this international collaboration," said Alain Aubertin, CEO of CRIAQ.

The ITB Policy is the government's main tool for leveraging procurement to create jobs and economic growth in Canada. Saab has submitted an offer of 88 Gripen E fighters for the Canadian FFCP, and a core element of the Gripen industrial offering includes CAE in Montreal, Quebec who will supply training and mission systems solutions.

The MoU was signed in April 2020.

 

Nilgiri

Experienced member
Moderator
Aviation Specialist
Messages
9,444
Reactions
107 19,151
Nation of residence
Canada
Nation of origin
India

Boeing has reached partnerships with five Canadian aerospace companies as part of the multi-billion Future Fighter Capability Project (FFCP) of Canada.

In August, Canada received three bids for the FFCP that seeks to procure 88 advanced fighter jets from Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and Saab.

Boeing offered its F/A-18 Super Hornet Block III aircraft for the project.



With the new collaborations, Boeing expects to deliver around C$61bn to boost the Canadian economy and generate around 250,000 jobs.

Boeing Canada managing director Charles Sullivan said: “Canada is one of Boeing’s most enduring partners and has continuously demonstrated that they have a robust and capable industry supporting both our commercial and defence businesses.


“The large scale and scope of these Canadian projects reinforces Boeing’s commitment to Canada and gives us an opportunity to build on our motto of promises made, promises kept.”

Boeing has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Montreal-based CAE for a Super Hornet training solution that includes mission simulators and contractor logistics support among others.

The MoU with L3Harris Technologies in Mirabel, Quebec, includes different sustainment services such as depot and base maintenance.
 

Nilgiri

Experienced member
Moderator
Aviation Specialist
Messages
9,444
Reactions
107 19,151
Nation of residence
Canada
Nation of origin
India

Boeing would perform final assembly of its F/A-18 Block III Super Hornets in the United States rather than Canada if it wins Canada’s Future Fighter Capability Project (FFCP) competition.

Jim Barnes, Boeing Defense, Space, and Security director of business development in Canada, on 27 October cited the small production run for performing final assembly in St. Louis, Missouri, where the Super Hornet is built. Canada will purchase 88 advanced fighters as part of its competition with the first aircraft anticipated for 2025. The procurement is expected to be worth USD11-14 billion.

“It was decided that the benefits of standing up these types of operations in Canada were not worth the investment,” Barnes said. “We are concentrating on the decades of life cycle support for our partners’ work share, including potential work on US Navy Super Hornets.”

Boeing is competing against the Saab Gripen E with production in Canada and the Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) for the FFCP. The winning company will replace the Royal Canadian Air Force’s (RCAF’s) legacy Boeing F/A-18 (CF-18/CF-188 in national service) fighter fleet.

The industrial and technical benefits (ITB) portion of an offeror’s bid is an important part of a proposal. Jennifer Seidman, Boeing international strategic partnerships country manager for Canada, said on 27 October that both defence production and skills development were part of the company’s ITB proposal, but that she could not provide further details.
 

Test7

Experienced member
Staff member
Administrator
Messages
4,787
Reactions
19 19,929
Nation of residence
United States of America
Nation of origin
Turkey
While the Canadian government is unsure about which new fighter to buy, Saab tries to close the upcoming gap

Canada_Saab_Gripen_RCAF_01_640.jpg




In a surprise move on 14 December 2020, during Aéro Montréal’s Innovation Forum 2020, Saab AB announced that it is offering to create two new aerospace centres in Quebec that will create and protect thousands of aerospace related jobs.

The two new centres are part of Saab’s proposal of the Saab 39 Gripen for Canada’s Future Fighter Capability Project. Saab, in co-operation with the Swedish government, has offered the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) 88 Gripen E fighter aircraft, with a comprehensive support and training package for the Future Fighter Capability Project.

The proposal includes a comprehensive, Canada-wide industrial and technological benefits programme of which these two centers have a key role. Known separately as the Gripen Centre and the Aerospace Research & Development Centre, they will be co-located in the Greater Montreal Region.

The Gripen Centre will be the fighter’s industrial and technological centerpiece, primarily staffed by the Gripen for Canada Team. Work at the Centre will be conducted by Canadians to ensure that the Gripen meets North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) requirements. The Gripen Centre will also act as a hub for supporting and sustaining the Gripen, while allowing Canada to manage future upgrades in-country.

The Aerospace R&D Centre will act as a focal point over decades for developing a rich ecosystem for research and innovation, representing a key component of Saab’s long-term vision in Canada. The Aerospace R&D Centre will develop, test and produce next generation aerospace systems and components to complement the existing Canadian aerospace industry, which may include unmanned aerial systems, artificial intelligence and environmentally friendly aviation technologies.

The race is certainly not over yet.

Earlier, Lockheed Martin submitted the F-35 Lightning II Request for Proposal response for Canada’s Future Fighter Capability Project. It was stated that the F-35 is the most advanced, best value fighter to replace the RCAF F-18 Hornet fleet. With its advanced sensors, the RCAF F-35 would surely be appreciated within the Five Eyes (FVEY) community. The FVEY-community is an intelligence alliance comprising Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States.

If the F-35 is chosen by Canada, then all within the FVEY community, with the exception of New Zealand, will have a true fifth generation stealth fighter in combination with an intelligence sensor platform. The latter, coupled with Canada's pledge to invest millions of dollars in the development of the F-35 stealth jet fighter, could well be the deciding factor.

To be continued.

 

Nilgiri

Experienced member
Moderator
Aviation Specialist
Messages
9,444
Reactions
107 19,151
Nation of residence
Canada
Nation of origin
India

Saab has offered to establish a new facility in Canada as part of its offer for Canada’s Future Fighter Capability Project (FFCP).

This would be known as the Saab Sensor Centre and would be located in Vancouver, British Columbia, with a focus on sensor technologies such as radar. The Saab Sensor Centre would provide career opportunities for Canadian engineering talent in the Vancouver area, as well offering research and development avenues for academia.

One of the proposed projects is to develop a Space Surveillance Radar (SSR) in Canada, in co-operation with other companies within the Canadian space industry. It is envisaged that this surface radar will target the global market for greater awareness of objects in the Earth’s orbit.

“So much of modern life and military capability depends on space-based assets. Today space is anything but empty when it comes to the Earth’s immediate vicinity with an increasing number of satellites and many more to come. We feel that Saab teamed with Canadian space partners are the perfect combination to co-develop a SSR for Canada and the global market,” said Simon Carroll, President of Saab Canada Inc.

A Saab radar demonstrator has been built and is the basis for a co-development opportunity of a SSR with Canadian companies and their world-leading expertise and knowledge. This demonstrator leverages radar technology as found in Saab’s military radars that operate across the world including on Canadian and US naval ships.

Saab, in co-operation with the Swedish government, has offered 88 Gripen E fighter aircraft, for Canada’s FFCP. The establishment of the Saab Sensor Centre is part of the associated Canada-wide Industrial and Technological Benefits program from Saab.
 

Nilgiri

Experienced member
Moderator
Aviation Specialist
Messages
9,444
Reactions
107 19,151
Nation of residence
Canada
Nation of origin
India

What the Alleged Report of Boeing's Disqualification May Mean for FFCP​


REPORTING BY JAMES CARELESS

“Ottawa declines Boeing's bid to replace Canada's aging fighter jet fleet”. So says a November 25, 2021 Canadian Press report published on CBC News. According to the Canadian Press:

“Three sources from industry and government say the message was delivered Wednesday as the other two companies competing for the $19 billion contract — U.S. defence giant Lockheed Martin and Swedish firm Saab — were told they met the government's requirements.

The three sources were all granted anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss these matters publicly.” But, the alleged ‘news’ of Boeing being bounced from the Future Fighter program is just that: Alleged.

Without names to add authority to the allegations, this is not official. Hence the hedge in the Canadian Press story: “But while Boeing's failure to meet the requirements would appear to disqualify the Super Hornet from the competition — leaving only Lockheed Martin's F-35 and Saab's Gripen fighter jet in the running — none of the companies have been told whether they are still in or out.”

So, what does this ‘news’ actually mean at this point? Without the federal government going on the record, it’s impossible to say. But we suspect this could mean that the defence industry and public are being softened up for the selection of a non-Boeing product on FFCP

We know from experience that in general, government ‘leaks’ are not leaks at all. Instead, they are deliberate, planned releases of information by government officials to selected news sources, to float ideas that the government wants to advance but equally wants to be able to renounce if there’s too much public outcry.

Although the media (to which I belong) likes to spin these releases as ‘scoops’ generated by their own efforts, they are anything but.

The fact that the Canadian Press report offers “Three sources” is meant to ‘prove’ that this ‘leak’ is credible, since it came from three sources, not just one. The same is true for the qualifier “from industry and government”. This is also meant to impart credibility to these anonymous sources.

The problem of course, is there is no way for the reader to know just how credible (or not) these three sources actually are, which is entirely the point. This lack of information provides plausible deniability on the part of government, which gives the Canadian Press the veneer of journalistic due diligence.

We know Canada has existing commitments to the F-35 program but Saab has offered to build the new fighter in Canada and as CDR has reported in Cover Stories on the Gripen E, that aircraft is capable of doing the job.

So, if this report is accurate, where does this leave the program? CTV News reported on July 21, 2021 (using another Canadian Press story), that “Canada has quietly made another multimillion-dollar payment toward development of the F-35 stealth fighter despite uncertainty over whether it will buy the aircraft and calls from some prominent Canadians not to purchase any new fighter jets ... While the new payment brings Canada's total investment in the F-35 to US$613 million since 1997, the government says:

"Canadian companies have also secured more than US$2 billion in production and maintenance contracts related to the stealth fighter.”

Does this mean that the way is being cleared to award the Future Fighter contract to Lockheed Martin? Because, according to the CP report, “Many observers had seen the Super Hornet and F-35 as the only real competition because of Canada's close relationship with the United States, which includes using fighter jets together to defend North American aerospace on a daily basis.”

The apparent bottom line: The anonymous sources cited by the Canadian Press story appear intent on authoritatively disqualifying Boeing from the Future Fighter program, without providing anyone in authority to take public responsibility for doing so.

Again, from the Canadian Press November 25, 2021 story: “The Department of National Defence and Public Services and Procurement Canada, which is managing the competition on behalf of the federal government, did not respond to requests for comment on Thursday.”

Therefore, we think it could be that the purpose of these ‘leaks’ is to allow the federal government to float a trial balloon about the possible selection of the F-35. One thing we do know is that PM Trudeau has disparaged that aircraft in the past so could Saab’s Gripen E now be in the driver’s seat?

We must now wait to see what the fallout is from this news - and by the way, CDR has already reached out to Boeing for comment – but unless this report causes sufficient public outcry to convince the federal government to disavow its claims, we suspect this may be a setup for the announcement of an F-35 selection as Canada’s next fighter jet.

Stay tuned to CDR Newsline for further developments.
 

Follow us on social media

Top Bottom