Korea Historical and Current regional relations of South Korea

Baljak

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More like Eurasia. My parents come from Eskisehir which is Central Anatolia which is the Asian part of Turkey majority of Turkey is in Asia while only 3 per cent is in Europe. My mums side are Bulgarian Turks while my Dads side hail from Crimean Turks/Tatars.

The Turks that live in the European side of Turkey can call themselves European if they want.

Turkey is also called Asia minor which is little Asia as the Europeans like the Greeks and Romans have underestimated how big Asia is.
My girlfriend is also from Konya, Turkey. When I lived in Izmir for 3 years, I met Turkish people with various looks. I still can't forget the old cultural remains of Turkey and the special attraction of the Turks.
 

Baljak

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Then go ahead to recognise Taiwan, what your government is waiting for?
Even if China whines like a child, China cannot control Taiwan now. This is why China does not want the presence of U.S. troops in Korea and Japan. China's black heart is known to all neighboring countries except China.
 

Baljak

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But why you government doesn't recognize Taiwan? can you explain this obvious? Why Taiwan's official name is "republic of China".
The Korean government and all Koreans are always rooting for Taiwanese in their hearts. China just have to keep whining like a child 😉
 

Ryder

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My girlfriend is also from Konya, Turkey. When I lived in Izmir for 3 years, I met Turkish people with various looks. I still can't forget the old cultural remains of Turkey and the special attraction of the Turks.

Thats really interesting. Konya was the capital city of the Seljuks of Anatolia.

I hope one day to visit this city. Last time I went to Turkey was in 2002. Cities I visited was Istanbul, Eskisehir, Bursa, Balikesir and Ankara.

Its going to be 20 years since I visited.
 

Baljak

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Thats really interesting. Konya was the capital city of the Seljuks of Anatolia.

I hope one day to visit this city. Last time I went to Turkey was in 2002. Cities I visited was Istanbul, Eskisehir, Bursa, Balikesir and Ankara.

Its going to be 20 years since I visited.
Turkey feels more and more attractive as I travel every time. I hope you can see beautiful Turkey again 😀
 

BordoEnes

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My girlfriend is also from Konya, Turkey. When I lived in Izmir for 3 years, I met Turkish people with various looks. I still can't forget the old cultural remains of Turkey and the special attraction of the Turks.
Wow this might be off-topic but that is legit mind blowing. Out of all places that you could get a girlfriend, you managed to get one from the single most religiously conservative traditional city in Turkey. I recently came back from Turkey and its literally Little Syria at this point. Bro you got game for real. Congrats damn lol.
 

BordoEnes

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Thats really interesting. Konya was the capital city of the Seljuks of Anatolia.

I hope one day to visit this city. Last time I went to Turkey was in 2002. Cities I visited was Istanbul, Eskisehir, Bursa, Balikesir and Ankara.

Its going to be 20 years since I visited.

Safe yourself the heartbreak and don't. Its completely taken over by Syrians and Afghans. I was there 2 weeks ago. The city itself is extremely beautiful, the people on the other hands are mostly Islamist foreigners.
 

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Safe yourself the heartbreak and don't. Its completely taken over by Syrians and Afghans. I was there 2 weeks ago. The city itself is extremely beautiful, the people on the other hands are mostly Islamist foreigners.

Antalya got ruined by drunk Russian tourists. My grandma around 2019 went to Turkiye and stayed at Alanya she really got annoyed by lots foreigners especially tourists.

Now Syrians and Afghans ruined Konya.

Im wondering what is happening to Eskisehir. I hope it does not get ruined.
 

Ryder

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Seriously Turkey hands out citizenships like candy while allowing a open door policy.

What a madhouse.

There needs to be restrictions. Seriously a lot of people will play the racism card. I gotta give it to Japan and South Korea due to them being anti PC they dont care what the world thinks when they restrict foreigners.

Too much is just too much. Turks are too saf man their good nature and hospitality get exploited.
 

Baljak

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Wow this might be off-topic but that is legit mind blowing. Out of all places that you could get a girlfriend, you managed to get one from the single most religiously conservative traditional city in Turkey. I recently came back from Turkey and its literally Little Syria at this point. Bro you got game for real. Congrats damn lol.
This may also be a off-topic conversation, but I am a Korean Muslim. When I lived in Turkey, I decided to become a Muslim and it has been more than 4 years since I became a Muslim. If I wasn't a Muslim, it would have been really hard to meet a Turkish girlfriend in a conservative Turkish city like Konya. 😂
 

Ryder

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This may also be a off-topic conversation, but I am a Korean Muslim. When I lived in Turkey, I decided to become a Muslim and it has been more than 4 years since I became a Muslim. If I wasn't a Muslim, it would have been really hard to meet a Turkish girlfriend in a conservative Turkish city like Konya. 😂

Thats interesting man.

Some Turkish soldiers during the Korean war taught some Koreans about Islam.

A lot of Turkish soldiers treated Korean orphans like their sons and daughters. It was hard for them even give them up and go home.
 

Baljak

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Thats interesting man.

Some Turkish soldiers during the Korean war taught some Koreans about Islam.

A lot of Turkish soldiers treated Korean orphans like their sons and daughters. It was hard for them even give them up and go home.
Turkey's army has accomplished so many things in the Korean War. They fought fierce battles with North Korean and Chinese forces until three years before the armistice was signed. And even after the end of the Korean War, Turkey's Brigade stationed its troops on the western front of Korea for several years and was in charge of defense, and did various good deeds to Korean citizens.
 

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Those without military knowledge are not aware that ICBM and SLBM are missile systems that share the same technology. if apply the technology of ICBM to a submarine, it becomes SLBM. The ICBM and SLBM are technically exactly the same. ICBM greatest weakness is that missiles are fired from fixed missile silos. This means that if the missile silo is destroyed, there is no means of responding. SLBM, on the other hand, has similar accuracy to ICBM, has the same range as ICBM, And is a more covert means of attacking targets than ICBM. For this reason, the UK, which is currently a representative maritime country, has scrapped ICBM and operates only SLBM separately.
that means S.Korea boomer boat will always be on constant deployment.
 

Nilgiri

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Turkey's army has accomplished so many things in the Korean War. They fought fierce battles with North Korean and Chinese forces until three years before the armistice was signed. And even after the end of the Korean War, Turkey's Brigade stationed its troops on the western front of Korea for several years and was in charge of defense, and did various good deeds to Korean citizens.

Heres a part of an earlier thread that speaks to that in deep way beyond words:


It is good thread to explore/post in if you like military history stuff btw.
 

RogerRanger

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South Korea is a sleeper nation, you never think about them, but they are very rich, capable and intelligent. Like a mini Japan. This is why I don't believe China will dominate Asia or East Asia, too many capable nations opposing it. Also the SK's have a good 'reason for developing' all sorts of weapons which will really be used against China and Japan, and not NK.
 

Ryder

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South Korea is a sleeper nation, you never think about them, but they are very rich, capable and intelligent. Like a mini Japan. This is why I don't believe China will dominate Asia or East Asia, too many capable nations opposing it. Also the SK's have a good 'reason for developing' all sorts of weapons which will really be used against China and Japan, and not NK.

Neither are they shackled to chains compared to Japan.
 

guest12

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Neither are they shackled to chains compared to Japan.
They are shackled 10 times worse than Japanese :

-Research Christian cults there and their connection to American Evangelists
-Percentage of total population converted to christianity by those cults
-How many high ranks goverment officals has membership to these cults
-Then watch some American Evangelists youtube videos about religous group travel to Israel and try to count number of converted Koreans in those videos
 
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Baljak

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They are shackled 10 times worse than Japanese :

-Research Christian cults there and their connection to American Evangelists
-Percentage of total population converted to christianity by those cults
-How many high ranks goverment officals has membership to these cults
-Then watch some American Evangelists youtube videos about religous group travel to Israel and try to count number of converted Koreans in those videos
What you say is half right and half wrong

South Korea is basically a country that recognizes religious freedom. Most Koreans take it for granted that they don't have a religion.

I didn't have a religion until I was 24 years old, and my sister still doesn't have a religion, and few of my Korean friends have a religion.

But my mother's family is Buddhist and my father's family is Catholic. But i was also an atheist before I became a Muslim. I am also a Muslim now, but my father's family was Catholic, so I was baptized in the cathedral when I was 24.

Christians such as fanatics, which are often seen in Korean news, do not exist in Korea that much. But, some Christians in Korea have selfish behavior and dangerous ideas from a religious point of view. For this reason, more and more Koreans express their disgust with Christianity these days.
 

Ryder

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What you say is half right and half wrong

South Korea is basically a country that recognizes religious freedom. Most Koreans take it for granted that they don't have a religion.

I didn't have a religion until I was 24 years old, and my sister still doesn't have a religion, and few of my Korean friends have a religion.

But my mother's family is Buddhist and my father's family is Catholic. But i was also an atheist before I became a Muslim. I am also a Muslim now, but my father's family was Catholic, so I was baptized in the cathedral when I was 24.

Christians such as fanatics, which are often seen in Korean news, do not exist in Korea that much. But, some Christians in Korea have selfish behavior and dangerous ideas from a religious point of view. For this reason, more and more Koreans express their disgust with Christianity these days.

Is Sk really an atheist society that people really claim?

I mean you have Koreans who follow a religion or ancient traditions and supersitions. Sk might have athiests buts its not entirely a athiest society right?
 

Baljak

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Is Sk really an atheist society that people really claim?

I mean you have Koreans who follow a religion or ancient traditions and supersitions. Sk might have athiests buts its not entirely a athiest society right?
To be exact, Koreans have a religion on the outside. But Koreans are not obsessed with religion in their daily lives. Most Koreans sometimes have a religion due to coercion from their parents when they are young, but when they become adults, they naturally move away from religion.

Even Korean Muslims don't keep praying five times a day. When I lived in Turkey, there were Turks like this. They introduce themselves as Muslims, but they said they drink alcohol and don't pray every day

Traditional superstitions and religious problems occur more in older people than in younger people in Korea. Religion accounts for very little in most ordinary Koreans' daily lives.
 

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