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Nilgiri

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A look into the MPF:

The MPF is an entirely new armored fighting vehicle recently selected for introduction into service. I walk around the vehicle with the MPF product manager LTC George, and pepper him with unexpected questions in order to shed a little more light on this platform. Vehicle filmed at Warren, MI, courtesy of PEO GCS.


@UkroTurk @Gary @500 et al.
 

Yasar_TR

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US‘s General Atomics has revealed a new type of ammunition/rounds that can be used from 155mm M777 howitzers with a range of 150km.
The round is fired to a very high altitude where it opens up its wings and glides to the target with high precision.
A 127mm version is also being considered for the naval guns whereby the maximum range will be around 100km.

”Food for thought for us”

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Soldier30

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The United States has tested the promising operational-tactical missile PrSM, which will replace the ATACMS missile. Lockheed Martin did not provide any details, but it is noted that the missile is capable of “neutralizing” targets at a range of up to 400 km, the estimated missile range is up to 499 km. Preliminary test results showed that the Precision Strike Missile Increment 1 missile confirmed its nominal performance. The missiles are planned to be used on the M270A1 and M142 HIMARS MLRS. Lockheed Martin reported that the corporation received three new contracts for the production of missiles. In the future, the new missile should replace all MGM-140 ATACMS operational-tactical missiles.

 

Soldier30

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The US Missile Defense Agency and Boeing have tested the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense missile defense system. A GMD missile successfully intercepted a medium-range ballistic missile in space. During the test, the upgraded GBI interceptor released an exoatmospheric kinetic device while the rocket's second boost stage was operating in a three-stage flight. Now, with the help of the third stage, you can adjust the operation of the interceptor, which makes it possible to hit a target that could not be immediately intercepted. Ground-Based Midcourse Defense is a missile defense system of the United States of America designed to intercept intercontinental ballistic missiles outside the earth's atmosphere. The system was put into operation in 2005. According to the latest data, 44 anti-missile installations are deployed in the United States.

 

Sanchez

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US Army cancels the FARA program aimed to replace Kiowas.

"We are learning from the battlefield – especially in Ukraine – that aerial reconnaissance has fundamentally changed," Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Randy George said in a statement accompanying the announcement. "Sensors and weapons mounted on a variety of unmanned systems and in space are more ubiquitous, further reaching, and more inexpensive than ever before. I am confident the Army can deliver for the Joint Force, both in the priority theater and around the globe, by accelerating innovation, procurement and fielding of modern unmanned aircraft systems, including the Future Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System, Launched Effects, and commercial small unmanned aircraft systems."

"What Gen. George's comments don't mention is that the war in Ukraine has also strongly called into question the general surivability of conventional helicopters on future high-end battlefields. Both Ukrainian and Russian forces have suffered significant helicopter losses in the course of the fighting and have adopted tactics that are focused squarely on keeping those platforms as far away from potential threats as possible."
 

uçuyorum

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US Army cancels the FARA program aimed to replace Kiowas.

"We are learning from the battlefield – especially in Ukraine – that aerial reconnaissance has fundamentally changed," Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Randy George said in a statement accompanying the announcement. "Sensors and weapons mounted on a variety of unmanned systems and in space are more ubiquitous, further reaching, and more inexpensive than ever before. I am confident the Army can deliver for the Joint Force, both in the priority theater and around the globe, by accelerating innovation, procurement and fielding of modern unmanned aircraft systems, including the Future Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System, Launched Effects, and commercial small unmanned aircraft systems."

"What Gen. George's comments don't mention is that the war in Ukraine has also strongly called into question the general surivability of conventional helicopters on future high-end battlefields. Both Ukrainian and Russian forces have suffered significant helicopter losses in the course of the fighting and have adopted tactics that are focused squarely on keeping those platforms as far away from potential threats as possible."
No doubt helicopters became very vulnerable. A significant portion of recon and strike duties can be handled by UAV, but not all. A mix of ground systems with long range or loitering munitions and various UAV and other fixed wing aircraft can certainly work well enough, but when you have uneven and difficult geography and bodies of water to cross, helicopters are still necessary, so if you can't have enough tanks and ifv etc, you still need attack, transport and multi purpose helicopters. Although, FARA sits in a weird spot in this mix, a light and fast aircraft meant to go deep and alone, that is certainly asking for stinger trouble. So this makes sense. But I doubt they'll give up apache, blackhawk, chinooks and the new tilt rotor transport.
 

Sanchez

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No doubt helicopters became very vulnerable. A significant portion of recon and strike duties can be handled by UAV, but not all. A mix of ground systems with long range or loitering munitions and various UAV and other fixed wing aircraft can certainly work well enough, but when you have uneven and difficult geography and bodies of water to cross, helicopters are still necessary, so if you can't have enough tanks and ifv etc, you still need attack, transport and multi purpose helicopters. Although, FARA sits in a weird spot in this mix, a light and fast aircraft meant to go deep and alone, that is certainly asking for stinger trouble. So this makes sense. But I doubt they'll give up apache, blackhawk, chinooks and the new tilt rotor transport.
Army already had plenty of drone projects for future as well, and also with drone-helicopter teaming. But yes, they probably mostly think that the time of scout helicopter is over when there's a proliferation of SHORADs over the world. Remember droves of Russian Mis being shot down while flying low in the first months of the war. Lessons to be learned.

Per the piece, they are not cancelling the Blackhawk replacement FLRAA V-280 and are instead increasing the number of UH60s and Chinooks they are set to buy, because air assault is still dependent on helicopters and it'll be some time before generals will entrust their soldiers to utility helicopter drones. They've also been working on turning Apache to a long distance engager with Spike NLOS and again with drone teaming.
 

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Bad news for Sikorksy though. They now lost both FLRAA and FARA.
 

Sanchez

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Bad news for Sikorksy though. They now lost both FLRAA and FARA.
And Bell is robbed of their double win. No way Raider X would win after Defiant fiasco in FLRAA. We can say that compound helicopters are sent away for this decade.
 

Fairon

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And Bell is robbed of their double win. No way Raider X would win after Defiant fiasco in FLRAA. We can say that compound helicopters are sent away for this decade.

GE also lost s huge customer for T901.

Maybe we can now get it for T925/929 till TS3000 is ready.

We should definetly try to use this situation.
 

Soldier30

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The US Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA showed tests of the RACER unmanned heavy transport platform. The RACER Heavy Platform autonomous robotic transport vehicle weighs 12 tons and expands the US autonomous vehicle series, which already includes the lightweight two-ton RACER RFV. The test was carried out in Texas, testing the drone's ability to follow a route on rough terrain. RACER RHP uses the Textron M5 base platform, used in US Army campaigns and designed for testing robotic vehicles.

 

Soldier30

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The Mesquite military plant in the United States will supply shells to Ukraine. The first video from the new US military plant in Mesquite, Texas. The plant is run by General Dynamics but owned by the Pentagon. The plant is designed to produce metal shell shells with calibers from 60 mm to 155 mm. The Universal Artillery Projectile Lines (UAPL) plant has a high degree of automation and is capable of producing up to 30,000 155 mm artillery shells per month. Some of the shells are planned to be sent to Ukraine. The shells will be filled with explosives at a military plant in Burlington, Indiana. Currently, metal shell casings in the United States are produced at two plants in Pennsylvania; they produce 36 thousand units of shells per month. We have already shown one of the military factories. By 2025, the United States plans to produce up to 100 thousand 155-caliber shells every month. It also became known that the United States initiated negotiations with Turkey on increasing purchases of Turkish-made TNT for use as an explosive filler in American-made ammunition.

 

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