Space Turkish Space Programs

Cypro

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Turkey plans spaceport in Somalia for $1bn moon mission​


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President Recep Tayyip Erdogan revealed an ambitious timetable with the aim of making contact with the moon on unmanned missions (Turkish Space Agency TUA)

By Ragip Soylu in Ankara

Turkey’s recently announced space programme, which aims to make a soft landing on the moon in 2028, will cost upwards of $1bn and would require building a rocket launch site in Somalia, a Turkish source familiar with the government’s plan told Middle East Eye.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan revealed last week an ambitious timetable that has two separate stages, with the aim of making contact with the moon on unmanned missions.

Ankara plans to make a hard landing on the moon with a locally produced hybrid rocket that would be launched into orbit in 2023, the republic’s centennial, through international cooperation.

The second stage aims to have a soft landing on the moon in 2028 with Turkey’s own capabilities, which would involve a shuttle that would carry out scientific research on the Earth's natural satellite.

However, the government has so far avoided questions regarding the cost of the programme and how it will proceed.

Budget queries​

Turkish opposition was quick to point out that the government-authorised body for the task, the Turkish Space Agency (TUA), has an annual budget of just over $40m, which is insufficient for such lofty objectives.

MEE's Turkish source said that the TUA was only tasked with coordinating the entire programme, and therefore it was natural that it didn’t have a larger budget.

'Having such a target will help Turkey to finally concentrate on the mission that is space'

- Turkish source

“The spending will be done through different government entities, such as state-owned major defence industry companies,” the source added. “The defence ministry itself will also make allocations.”

Initial plans submitted to Erdogan a few years ago showed that little-known Turkish presidency subsidiary Deltav (Space Technologies Incorporated Company) would be the recipient of the bulk of the spending, with a budget of more than $600m.

Arif Karabeyoglu, chairman of Deltav, announced last year that the company had already produced a rocket engine that uses liquid oxygen and paraffin, a crucial capability for the space programme.

The programme, which in total is expected to cost the government at least $1.1bn according to MEE's source, includes an aggressive investment for space infrastructure.

Rocket from Somalia​

The same source said the government plans to build a rocket launch site in Somalia, a key Turkish security partner since 2011, which also hosts Turkey’s largest training base in the world.

Somalia isn’t a stranger for space enthusiasts: France also considered using the country to host a spaceport in the 1960s due to its close proximity to the equator, which makes it more suitable for rocket launches.

Serdar Huseyin Yildirim, the president of Turkish Space Agency, refused to comment on Somalia in an interview with BBC Turkish on 12 February, citing sensitive talks with the host country, which he wouldn’t name.

However, MEE's Turkish source said other alternatives such as Libya weren’t likely because Turkey had a greater influence in Somalia and it was scientifically more favourable.

The government’s draft calculations suggest establishing and maintaining the spaceport in Somalia would cost more than $350m.

The government also aims to allocate grants for Turkish doctoral students to go abroad to study astrophysics, and will provide research and development funding for Turkish universities, altogether for around $150m.

Yildirim told the media in repeated interviews that the space programme would help Turkey advance its technology and make crucial investments in sectors that would make the country more competitive in the long run.

The government still needs to find a foreign entity capable of launching the Turkish rocket to space in 2023 where, after reaching the lower Earth orbit, the rocket would be directed to the moon.

Yildirim told a Turkish newspaper that funding for the project could be financed through international donors since there are many parties interested in space projects.

However, MEE's source said that since the programme itself would require the development of missiles, foreign investment would be unlikely.

"The plans would most likely evolve over time, since the 2023 and 2028 targets are pretty aggressive and there are many variables that could change," the source added. "Yet, having such a target will help Turkey to finally concentrate on the mission that is space."



I knew it.. But I hope they do calculations for securing Somalia and building a spaceport abroad vs Launch cost at home. Always better to have more expensive secure base at home.

Considering Elon Musk have also problems with USA, If I were government of Turkey, I would offer him a partnership over Somalia, Turkey Secures the ground, provides the infrastructure and SpaceX provides know-how and tech.
 
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ekemenirtu

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Yeah I didn't word that well. It was referring as far as possible close to due-east (bearing/azimuth) launch....rather than longitude position.





Yep, correct. Effectively the same amount of fuel burned in the launcher gets you a higher speed given the velocity of earths rotation (the worst direction would be due west in which case you need to overcome the "counter" velocity from the get go).

That is a large benefit to that.

Also if you plan to have your final orbit inclination close to 0...it is beneficial too (in fact often much larger benefit than the velocity imparted by due east launch)....as the inclination change you need to affect upon the satellite is lowered (thus lowering fuel you need to launch with the satellite)....as the (starting) inclination will simply be whatever your launch latitude is...rather than have more added to it by an initial bearing that is not due east.

This is especially a factor in geostationary-birds which have lot more to do (to get to geo-orbit) once inserted into LEO or their initial elliptical orbit, and are generally quite large/massive satellites too...and thus it is very optimal if you don't have to worry about changing inclination much and minimize your fuel budget.




Yes same reason as above, if the final desired inclination is 90 degrees (a polar orbit, eg. a sun synchronous one)....launching due south (or due north) is optimal as no large inclination change is needed after LEO or elliptical orbit achieved.

Thanks for your response.

It appears you agree with me.

As you have stated, it often makes most sense to launch a payload to its desired inclination from the surface of planet Earth rather than alter its inclination during flight.
 

Test7

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Turkish firm to develop hybrid rocket tech for 2023 moon mission​


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An Istanbul-based space technology firm is expected to develop the authentic hybrid engine technology that will enable Turkey to successfully achieve its mission to the moon, the industry and technology minister said Sunday.

Working on the design and production aspect of hybrid rocket technologies, Delta V Space Technologies plans to fire its own rocket that will break the space barrier this summer, Varank said on the sidelines of his visit to the company’s facilities.

“We expect Delta V to develop engines that will make our own firing in space on our moon mission,” the minister said.

His remarks come after President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan last month unveiled the country’s ambitious 10-year National Space Progam that includes missions to the moon, sending Turkish astronauts on a scientific mission in space and developing internationally viable satellite systems.

Erdoğan said Turkey plans to establish “a first contact with the moon” in 2023 when the country marks the centennial of the founding of the Republic of Turkey.


The mission to the moon will be completed in two stages.

In the first stage, a rough landing will be made on the moon with a national and authentic hybrid rocket that will be launched into orbit at the end of 2023 through international cooperation.

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“In 2023, we want to make contact with the moon for the first time using our own national and original technologies,” Varank said.

“First of all, we will make the first launch into orbit with international cooperation, but we will launch our own national rocket into orbit and meet our spacecraft with the moon,” the minister noted.

In the second stage in 2028, the country will launch its own rockets into space in the same way they did the probe.

The space roadmap is designed to enter Turkey into the space arena and boost its share in the developing space economy, Varank said.

“Turkey has very important capabilities developed in the space field. We have set important goals in full coordination by combining these capabilities with the National Space Program prepared by the Turkish Space Agency (TUA),” the minister noted.

TUA was established in 2018 with the aim of joining a handful of other countries with space programs.

Hybrid rocket engines provide a significant cost advantage compared to other rocket engines in the space industry, which is rapidly commercializing, and costs are becoming an important factor.

Many developed countries in the world aim to take the lead in this area by developing new generation systems with hybrid rocket engines.

Since 2017, Delta V has been working on the development, technology demonstration and product transformation of chemical rocket engine technologies that can be used in advanced space applications.

 

Ecderha

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I would like to share some very useful explanation about rocket engines


Important things in video- > 3:40 ; 7:05; 19:40 ; 39:40
 
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Cabatli_53

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DeltaV has introduced its capability. I think this hybrid propellant case has a diameter around 70-80cm. Roketsan will also introduce a 1,35m diameter solid propellant rocket motor for Mufa-Test.
ErdY0l_XcAE4aD0.jpeg.jpg
 
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Combat-Master

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"We established the DeltaV company and it continues on its way as a Defense Industry Presidency company. We have Space Agency on our space travel. The companies within us will form the basic technologies in this journey."
 

what

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Why do we have two companies working on the same tech? Delta-V and Roketsan if i'm not mistaken.
 

Nilgiri

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Why do we have two companies working on the same tech? Delta-V and Roketsan if i'm not mistaken.

It seems TUA is the national space agency. Then these two (Rokestan and Delta V) are the tech developers for the agency.

ROKETSAN owners are SOEs....so they can leverage from the RnD base in those (and roketsan itself) already like they already have with the sounding rocket tests.

So I would imagine Delta-V is more startup+private owned to pursue some more degrees of freedom in what is out there to absorb/research, test and implement....that SOE's might be constrained in doing.
 

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TUA chief Serdar Hüseyin Yıldırım suggest the name Fezagir for the Turkish astronaut which is not too bad but I have got a better one. He said he heard thousands of names but not a brilliant one just yet.
 

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Cooperation between TIM and ITU to contribute to the National Space Program


According to Turkey's Exporters Assembly statement, the protocol will be signed on March 11, ITU Space Systems Design and Test Laboratory within Innovator I will be carried out in coordination with the "Nano, Micro, Cube Multi-Function in Satellite Solar Panel R & D Project" will come to life. With the project, multi-functional, domestic solar panels will be developed for nano and micro satellites, which are very common in the world and are very low in cost.

With the project achieving its goal in 2023, it is expected that solar panels will be developed and exported with low cost and innovative techniques.

Speaking in the statement, TIM President İsmail Gülle said, "The National Space Program, which will carry our country to the top in the global space race, proudly supports the innovation and innovation ecosystem and believes that there is innovation behind all our national goals. We will carry our flag that suits the skies best to the places it deserves. We will develop the space subsystem, which we are dependent on abroad, in the information infrastructure of our country, following the statements' Our feet will be in the world, our eyes will be in space. aim. " used the expressions.

It is aimed to reduce dependency abroad

The R&D project is expected to contribute directly to the "Gathering Satellite Production Under a Single Roof and Domestic Satellite Development Program", "Improving the Space Industry Ecosystem" and "Developing Space Awareness and Human Resources" among 10 goals within the scope of the National Space Program Roadmap.

Within the scope of InovaTIM's first R&D project, 100 InovaTIM students will be involved in the process and gain "know-how". With the project, it is aimed to gain capability on economic production techniques and development processes of solar panels used in nano, micro and cube satellites. In this way, it is aimed to develop a very costly space subsystem that is dependent on abroad. It is planned that solar panels will reach the export level with the contribution of the cube satellite development trainings and bilateral cooperation given to many countries abroad. In addition, the scientists trained in the laboratory will gain an additional capability and will increase self-confidence for further studies.

Satellite projects in the "Cube Satellite" and "Small Satellite" categories, which are seen as a very powerful tool for applied and scientific space research, stand out as studies accepted all over the world. Among the features of these projects are that their costs are much lower, that they are a very good method of training personnel, and that they offer the opportunity to realize even countries with low space budgets.

Joint projects from TIM and ITU

The protocol to be signed between TIM and ITU is not limited to the satellite project. We will act together to develop joint activities and specific working areas for university-industry cooperation. Joint R&D activities will be carried out. Cooperation will be made on vocational education, innovation, digital transformation activities, entrepreneurship, academic studies and employment of university students and graduates.

Relations between TIM, exporter unions and members and ITU management, faculty members, researchers and students will be encouraged in branding, national and international events, organizations, fairs and research. Common use of the results of research studies will be provided. Joint scientific and business organizations will be held.
 
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