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mulj

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Star Wars desert environments were usually filmed in Morocco.
i am more fascinated with resemblance of sufi mastery in it and how it is sold without proper referencing, for example padawan/master relationship it is copy paste of student/sheikh relationship.
 

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E9GyaiMXsAM5ced.jpeg


Julius Evola on the Uygurs and why he believed that Communist China will lose against them.
 

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So it seems turkics, mongolics, tungusics, koreanic and the japonic languages come from the same Amur river people before branching out.

It is ongoing research area, it wont be resolved conclusively for quite some time.

But definitely there are indications and signs there was likely a connection....but for time being Japanese and Korean are still treated as language isolates technically till the evidence is more overwhelming on the connections to the steppe.

All these languages are agglutinative for example. Extremely different to (analytic) Chinese languages. Being speaker of Cantonese myself, I know just how different the language structure is to agglutinative (Tamil) and fusional (English, Hindi etc) that I also know.

Japanese, Korean (writing wise) had to quickly adapt Chinese script to a broken down syllable form (since characters cannot even be inflected in a slight way) for that very reason.
 

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Turks were either a South Siberian tribe or an agricultural civilization somewhere in Manchuria that turned nomadic after climate change.
 

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It is ongoing research area, it wont be resolved conclusively for quite some time.

But definitely there are indications and signs there was likely a connection....but for time being Japanese and Korean are still treated as language isolates technically till the evidence is more overwhelming on the connections to the steppe.

All these languages are agglutinative for example. Extremely different to (analytic) Chinese languages. Being speaker of Cantonese myself, I know just how different the language structure is to agglutinative (Tamil) and fusional (English, Hindi etc) that I also know.

Japanese, Korean (writing wise) had to quickly adapt Chinese script to a broken down syllable form (since characters cannot even be inflected in a slight way) for that very reason.
Whats the difference between cantonese and mandarin?
 

Nilgiri

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Whats the difference between cantonese and mandarin?

I will try keep it short, the difference is considerable and big (it can be called another language even, since prima facie they are mutually unintellgible for the most part when speaking).

The difference arises because of the written register differing greatly from the vernacular in the way it does in Chinese quite specifically (because of its analytic phonosemantic structure).

The closest you might be able to start to comprehend on it personally is say if a time traveller from a more archaic form of Turkish, came to talk to you today. Or you might get an inkling talking to another Turkic language person (say uzbek) and see how much you understand etc...but how much becomes understandable later (easily) with learning older cognates that may have left Turkish or vice versa.

Cantonese preserves lot of Tang-dynasty era language features/cognates in notably its vernacular....in multiple different ways (both sound change of the syllable and also completely different syllable sometimes).

This is exacerbated by it being analytical just like Mandarin (their grammar ends up being near identical for example). More on that at the bottom.

When they say the writing is all the same, that is the written register that is "Standard"....shared to very large degree with Mandarin.

But 20th century, the "classical" literary form also took a big change (i.e it dropped with end of Qing dynasty and needs to be studied now though it is taught in chinese schools to some degree so chinese do have basic level to access their earlier historical literature).

In essence that drop means even Cantonese is now evolving written registers that turns out fairly gobbledegook to a mandarin fella (i.e written that mimics its vernacular much more and uses same sounds etc)....as no one really studies the full range of chinese characters to that level (and then make sense of it).

This actually is now taking on a political dimension increasingly as HK finds this (written cantonese "way") a silent protest way to shield from CCP overreach.

If you have time for it you can read a whatsapp soundbite i wrote to some friends who enquired on very much the same thing earlier:

canto.jpg


@Deliorman @UkroTurk 🚬 @T-123456 @Joe Shearer @VCheng @Saithan @Kartal1 @MisterLike
@Indos @Anmdt @AlphaMike et al.

An earlier look in this subforum on agglutination (that Dravidian, Turkic, Japonic and Korean share along with Austronesian and others ) vis a vis fusional/synthetic and analytical, the larger pages they are found contain related context:


 

TR_123456

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I will try keep it short, the difference is considerable and big (it can be called another language even, since prima facie they are mutually unintellgible for the most part when speaking).

The difference arises because of the written register differing greatly from the vernacular in the way it does in Chinese quite specifically (because of its analytic phonosemantic structure).

The closest you might be able to start to comprehend on it personally is say if a time traveller from a more archaic form of Turkish, came to talk to you today. Or you might get an inkling talking to another Turkic language person (say uzbek) and see how much you understand etc...but how much becomes understandable later (easily) with learning older cognates that may have left Turkish or vice versa.

Cantonese preserves lot of Tang-dynasty era language features/cognates in notably its vernacular....in multiple different ways (both sound change of the syllable and also completely different syllable sometimes).

This is exacerbated by it being analytical just like Mandarin (their grammar ends up being near identical for example). More on that at the bottom.

When they say the writing is all the same, that is the written register that is "Standard"....shared to very large degree with Mandarin.

But 20th century, the "classical" literary form also took a big change (i.e it dropped with end of Qing dynasty and needs to be studied now though it is taught in chinese schools to some degree so chinese do have basic level to access their earlier historical literature).

In essence that drop means even Cantonese is now evolving written registers that turns out fairly gobbledegook to a mandarin fella (i.e written that mimics its vernacular much more and uses same sounds etc)....as no one really studies the full range of chinese characters to that level (and then make sense of it).

This actually is now taking on a political dimension increasingly as HK finds this (written cantonese "way") a silent protest way to shield from CCP overreach.

If you have time for it you can read a whatsapp soundbite i wrote to some friends who enquired on very much the same thing earlier:

View attachment 32276

@Deliorman @UkroTurk 🚬 @T-123456 @Joe Shearer @VCheng @Saithan @Kartal1 @MisterLike
@Indos @Anmdt @AlphaMike et al.

An earlier look in this subforum on agglutination (that Dravidian, Turkic, Japonic and Korean share along with Austronesian and others ) vis a vis fusional/synthetic and analytical, the larger pages they are found contain related context:


So Polyglot,how many languages do you speak and understand?
 

Nilgiri

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So Polyglot,how many languages do you speak and understand?

At full conversational comfy level:

Tamil (and malayalam to similar degree....but that is kind of like Turkish and Azeri for you guys).

English

Hindi (and most of Urdu by that process)

Cantonese (still learning to read characters though)

French

So I would say 5 number wise....by adequate-good fluency definition.

I am picking up Spanish and Mandarin currently. Might as well.
 

TR_123456

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At full conversational comfy level:

Tamil (and malayalam to similar degree....but that is kind of like Turkish and Azeri for you guys).

English

Hindi (and most of Urdu by that process)

Cantonese (still learning to read characters though)

French

I am picking up Spanish and Mandarin currently. Might as well.
Wow,9 languages.
 

Nilgiri

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Wow,9 languages.

Gets to above 10 if you include semi-fluency in related dravidian languages like Kannada and Telugu.

Like I can understand them to some degree (listening)....but not a comfy talker for it by any stretch.

They often can do the same for Tamil....so in a way we understand each other but cant really speak the other etc.

Malayalam and Tamil are much firmer closer brothers....essentially a language continuum like Turkish in anatolia.

Telugu on other hand "split first" from Tamil in the language tree (like say Turkish compared to central asian turkic language)....it is quite different....but I am ok at understanding some part of it by listening....as I watched lot of movies etc.
 

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I will try keep it short, the difference is considerable and big (it can be called another language even, since prima facie they are mutually unintellgible for the most part when speaking).

The difference arises because of the written register differing greatly from the vernacular in the way it does in Chinese quite specifically (because of its analytic phonosemantic structure).

The closest you might be able to start to comprehend on it personally is say if a time traveller from a more archaic form of Turkish, came to talk to you today. Or you might get an inkling talking to another Turkic language person (say uzbek) and see how much you understand etc...but how much becomes understandable later (easily) with learning older cognates that may have left Turkish or vice versa.

Cantonese preserves lot of Tang-dynasty era language features/cognates in notably its vernacular....in multiple different ways (both sound change of the syllable and also completely different syllable sometimes).

This is exacerbated by it being analytical just like Mandarin (their grammar ends up being near identical for example). More on that at the bottom.

When they say the writing is all the same, that is the written register that is "Standard"....shared to very large degree with Mandarin.

But 20th century, the "classical" literary form also took a big change (i.e it dropped with end of Qing dynasty and needs to be studied now though it is taught in chinese schools to some degree so chinese do have basic level to access their earlier historical literature).

In essence that drop means even Cantonese is now evolving written registers that turns out fairly gobbledegook to a mandarin fella (i.e written that mimics its vernacular much more and uses same sounds etc)....as no one really studies the full range of chinese characters to that level (and then make sense of it).

This actually is now taking on a political dimension increasingly as HK finds this (written cantonese "way") a silent protest way to shield from CCP overreach.

If you have time for it you can read a whatsapp soundbite i wrote to some friends who enquired on very much the same thing earlier:

View attachment 32276

@Deliorman @UkroTurk 🚬 @T-123456 @Joe Shearer @VCheng @Saithan @Kartal1 @MisterLike
@Indos @Anmdt @AlphaMike et al.

An earlier look in this subforum on agglutination (that Dravidian, Turkic, Japonic and Korean share along with Austronesian and others ) vis a vis fusional/synthetic and analytical, the larger pages they are found contain related context:



Just for your information, older sister is called Uni in South Korea, West Sumatran people (Minang ethnic) also call our older sister as Uni....Need further study on this, but based on DNA there is two DNA component that is only exist in East Asian and doesnt exist in Indonesian archipelago, except Sumatran.

This you can see yellow component (N) and also see D component although very small

1632715625258.png
 
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Ryder

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Gets to above 10 if you include semi-fluency in related dravidian languages like Kannada and Telugu.

Like I can understand them to some degree (listening)....but not a comfy talker for it by any stretch.

They often can do the same for Tamil....so in a way we understand each other but cant really speak the other etc.

Malayalam and Tamil are much firmer closer brothers....essentially a language continuum like Turkish in anatolia.

Telugu on other hand "split first" from Tamil in the language tree (like say Turkish compared to central asian turkic language)....it is quite different....but I am ok at understanding some part of it by listening....as I watched lot of movies etc.

I only know English and Turkish lmaoo

😆
 
T

Turko

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At full conversational comfy level:

Tamil (and malayalam to similar degree....but that is kind of like Turkish and Azeri for you guys).

English

Hindi (and most of Urdu by that process)

Cantonese (still learning to read characters though)

French

So I would say 5 number wise....by adequate-good fluency definition.

I am picking up Spanish and Mandarin currently. Might as well.
You are smart as hell.
 

VCheng

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Whats the difference between cantonese and mandarin?

I will try keep it short, the difference is considerable and big (it can be called another language even, since prima facie they are mutually unintellgible for the most part when speaking).

My favorite name for a regional Chinese dialect is Fukienese. :D
 

Nilgiri

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Just for your information, older sister is called Uni in South Korea, West Sumatran people (Minang ethnic) also call our older sister as Uni....Need further study on this, but based on DNA there is two DNA component that is only exist in East Asian and doesnt exist in Indonesian archipelago, except Sumatran.

This you can see yellow component (N) and also see D component although very small

View attachment 32292

It is actually the pre-existing tribes of southern china (before Wu Di* expansion phase ) that provide another basis for Cantonese and Yue language in general being quite different to Mandarin. China might have absorbed them as Han a long long time ago, but certain artefacts remain in the spoken language.

It is why Cantonese bears more similar "sound" to Vietnamese for example in certain areas....much more so than with "Guanhua" mandarin.

*Emperor Wu is fascinating part to read about China's earlier History for anyone looking to add context to their knowledge of China overall.
 

Nilgiri

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I only know English and Turkish lmaoo

😆

That is still two very different languages, and you are bilingual (most people in world are monolingual still).

In fact you probably have these official linguistic terms to put w.r.t "agglutinative" and "fusional" (Turkish and English respectively) on what you inherently already were doing without knowing heh.

Turkish lends itself to making some very long words (just like Tamil) indeed....and in common case makes lot of 2 and 3-part words (i.e agglutination) much more than English.

That stuff is essentially what does not happen at all in any Chinese language. Every word is separate as is due to the characters. Its the characters that really enforced this over 2000+ years to not stray from the system and to avoid altogether taking more innovative "fuse/merge" shortcut etc....that form bedrock of other language systems.
 

Nilgiri

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My favorite name for a regional Chinese dialect is Fukienese. :D

This is actually an example of more well known change from Peking ---> Beijing in the transliteration.

The k ---> j shift from conservative literary register (that aligned with current cantonese more) to one of the northern vernacular.

The drop (I mentioned earlier) that happened after Qing fell and the modern era commenced (and all the resulting changes that it brought like simplified characters etc that is whole different chapter of story)....i.e what would be the modern standard? Might made right on lot of it.

So it is generally known as Fujian/Fujianese among the mainlanders....but Fukian/Fukianese is still in common use esp by the diaspora (where southerners and cantonese still form large % esp legacy migrant %).
 

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