TR UAV/UCAV Programs | Anka - series | Kızılelma | TB - series

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From TAI MAG 135:

ANKA III Took to the Skies

The ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, developed in 15 months as a high-speed UAV system with low
observability and the capacity to carry diverse payloads, made its maiden flight in the final days of 2023.
This milestone represented another significant success during the year for our company, solidifying our
position within the industry.

Our company has successfully realized the goals established
years ago, aiming to mark a significant milestone for our Republic's centennial and our company's 50th anniversary, thereby reshaping Türkiye's standing within the aviation industry as
a producer of jet and fighter aircraft. As part of our 2023 goals,
we proudly unveiled our indigenous and national products to
the global stage.
At the Century of the Future Launch Program held on May 1,
2023, in the presence of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the
ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) shared the stage with
the Turkish Fighter KAAN, the Jet Trainer Aircraft HÜRJET, the
Heavy Class Attack Helicopter ATAK II, and the Utility Helicop-
ter T625 GÖKBEY. ANKA III, whose development process com-
menced in 2022, made its maiden flight in the final days of 2023.
The ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, developed entirely
with domestic capabilities by our company, successfully took
off from the runway for its maiden flight at 08:38 on December
28, 2023. The flight, conducted at our facilities, lasted 1 hour
and 10 minutes.
During its maiden flight, ANKA III also conducted a go-around
test, reaching an altitude of 8,000 feet at a speed of 150 knots.
Notably, ANKA III’s flight was accompanied by the HÜRKUŞ Ba-
sic Trainer Aircraft and ANKA Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan shared footage of ANKA III's
maiden flight on his social media account, emphasizing, “Our
unmanned combat aerial vehicle ANKA III, developed by Turkish Aerospace, successfully completed its maiden flight today.
Its advanced technologies, design, and features will play a vital
role in enhancing our country's defense capabilities.”
Commenting on ANKA III's maiden flight, which took off from
our facilities enthusiastically observed by our executives and
colleagues, Prof. Temel Kotil, CEO of Turkish Aerospace, said,
"We wish ANKA III best of luck. God bless our country; we now
have a UAV in the sky that the enemy cannot see, but can see
its enemy. May it achieve great success."

Design phase concluded

The development activities for ANKA III, which successfully
completed its maiden flight, started in 2022. After the System
Requirements Review Meeting in March of that year, the system
requirements were finalized. Subsequently, on April 11, 2022,
the Preliminary Design Review Meeting took place, during
which the external geometry design was determined.
Sharing the avionic architecture of ANKA and AKSUNGUR,
ANKA III incorporates distinct subsystems, particularly the
newly designed propulsion system. Design work on these sub-
systems progressed swiftly. The Critical Design Review Phase
commenced on October 14, 2022, and was followed by the
production of the aircraft's initial detailed parts on November
7, 2022.
The software requirements for the changed systems were pre-
pared, leading to the release of the maiden flight control, air,
and ground software versions for ANKA III on November 10,
2022.
In March 2023, following the structural assembly that finished in
January and the equipment installations which were completed
in February, ANKA III was powered up for the first time. It under-
went taxi tests on April 15, 2023, taking to the runway. Having
completed its maiden flight on December 28, 2023, ANKA III
stands out as a UAV system that boasts increased speed due to
its jet engine, a notable payload capacity, and enhanced radar
stealth owing to its tailless design.

ANKA III’s features

The ground systems used in ANKA and AKSUNGUR became
the foundation for ANKA III, which stood apart from its family
with its new software. The ground systems that control ANKA
and AKSUNGUR will also control the ANKA III system. This allows the three systems to be used as complementary elements
in joint missions. The software used in ANKA and AKSUNGUR,
which has been developed and improved over time during approximately 200,000 flight hours, forms the basis of the ANKA
III system's software.
The ANKA III system is designed to carry 650 kilograms of ammunition in each of its two fuselage stations, another 650 kilo-
grams in each of the inner wing stations, and 100 kilograms in
each of the outer stations. This allows for the integration of a variety of options, including large munitions such as SOM-J, MK-82, and SDBs, which are commonly used in UAVs. Additionally,
the developed oleo-pneumatic landing gear will be capable of
carrying takeoff and landing loads on the aircraft.
With its high payload capacity, numerous internal and external
ammunition stations, and low-visibility design, the ANKA III system has the capability to take the lead role in many missions.
ANKA III will be able to perform missions in addition to reconnaissance, surveillance, intelligence, and attack missions with
various air-to-ground and air-to-air munitions. These missions
include engaging enemy helicopters, propeller-driven aircraft,
and UAVs using air-to-air munitions; conducting hunting operations; neutralizing enemy RF radar and air defense systems;
guarding friendly forces in the air and on the ground; signal and
communication intelligence; electronic warfare; and operations
and communication with other friendly elements.
Our company developed a domestic autopilot system for the
tailless configuration and designed a new controller for the aircraft to enable the system to take off, cruise, and land autonomously. In addition to dual redundant GPS receivers, ANKA III
will also be able to take off and land automatically with a radar
altimeter.

ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle’s missions

• Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Signals Intelligence
• Air-to-Ground Attack
• Strategic Assault Mission
• Air Defense Systems Suppression
• Air Interception
• Support to Naval Operations
• Close Air Support
• Electronic Warfare
• Protection
• Manned-Unmanned Cooperation

ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle’s main features

• Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW): 6,500 kg
• Payload Capacity: 1,200 kg
• Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft
• Maximum Speed: 0.7 Mach
• Endurance: 10 hours
 

Zafer

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• Air Interception
One of the Anka3 drone's roles is air interception, of actually what? Drones, helicopters, freighters, other slow planes and cruise missiles are a given but can she intercept 4th and 5th generation fighters. I don't see why not owing to its stealth character I would say she is "ambush master #2" against fighter jets.
 

boredaf

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From TAI MAG 135:

ANKA III Took to the Skies

The ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, developed in 15 months as a high-speed UAV system with low
observability and the capacity to carry diverse payloads, made its maiden flight in the final days of 2023.
This milestone represented another significant success during the year for our company, solidifying our
position within the industry.

Our company has successfully realized the goals established
years ago, aiming to mark a significant milestone for our Republic's centennial and our company's 50th anniversary, thereby reshaping Türkiye's standing within the aviation industry as
a producer of jet and fighter aircraft. As part of our 2023 goals,
we proudly unveiled our indigenous and national products to
the global stage.
At the Century of the Future Launch Program held on May 1,
2023, in the presence of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the
ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) shared the stage with
the Turkish Fighter KAAN, the Jet Trainer Aircraft HÜRJET, the
Heavy Class Attack Helicopter ATAK II, and the Utility Helicop-
ter T625 GÖKBEY. ANKA III, whose development process com-
menced in 2022, made its maiden flight in the final days of 2023.
The ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, developed entirely
with domestic capabilities by our company, successfully took
off from the runway for its maiden flight at 08:38 on December
28, 2023. The flight, conducted at our facilities, lasted 1 hour
and 10 minutes.
During its maiden flight, ANKA III also conducted a go-around
test, reaching an altitude of 8,000 feet at a speed of 150 knots.
Notably, ANKA III’s flight was accompanied by the HÜRKUŞ Ba-
sic Trainer Aircraft and ANKA Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan shared footage of ANKA III's
maiden flight on his social media account, emphasizing, “Our
unmanned combat aerial vehicle ANKA III, developed by Turkish Aerospace, successfully completed its maiden flight today.
Its advanced technologies, design, and features will play a vital
role in enhancing our country's defense capabilities.”
Commenting on ANKA III's maiden flight, which took off from
our facilities enthusiastically observed by our executives and
colleagues, Prof. Temel Kotil, CEO of Turkish Aerospace, said,
"We wish ANKA III best of luck. God bless our country; we now
have a UAV in the sky that the enemy cannot see, but can see
its enemy. May it achieve great success."

Design phase concluded

The development activities for ANKA III, which successfully
completed its maiden flight, started in 2022. After the System
Requirements Review Meeting in March of that year, the system
requirements were finalized. Subsequently, on April 11, 2022,
the Preliminary Design Review Meeting took place, during
which the external geometry design was determined.
Sharing the avionic architecture of ANKA and AKSUNGUR,
ANKA III incorporates distinct subsystems, particularly the
newly designed propulsion system. Design work on these sub-
systems progressed swiftly. The Critical Design Review Phase
commenced on October 14, 2022, and was followed by the
production of the aircraft's initial detailed parts on November
7, 2022.
The software requirements for the changed systems were pre-
pared, leading to the release of the maiden flight control, air,
and ground software versions for ANKA III on November 10,
2022.
In March 2023, following the structural assembly that finished in
January and the equipment installations which were completed
in February, ANKA III was powered up for the first time. It under-
went taxi tests on April 15, 2023, taking to the runway. Having
completed its maiden flight on December 28, 2023, ANKA III
stands out as a UAV system that boasts increased speed due to
its jet engine, a notable payload capacity, and enhanced radar
stealth owing to its tailless design.

ANKA III’s features

The ground systems used in ANKA and AKSUNGUR became
the foundation for ANKA III, which stood apart from its family
with its new software. The ground systems that control ANKA
and AKSUNGUR will also control the ANKA III system. This allows the three systems to be used as complementary elements
in joint missions. The software used in ANKA and AKSUNGUR,
which has been developed and improved over time during approximately 200,000 flight hours, forms the basis of the ANKA
III system's software.
The ANKA III system is designed to carry 650 kilograms of ammunition in each of its two fuselage stations, another 650 kilo-
grams in each of the inner wing stations, and 100 kilograms in
each of the outer stations. This allows for the integration of a variety of options, including large munitions such as SOM-J, MK-82, and SDBs, which are commonly used in UAVs. Additionally,
the developed oleo-pneumatic landing gear will be capable of
carrying takeoff and landing loads on the aircraft.
With its high payload capacity, numerous internal and external
ammunition stations, and low-visibility design, the ANKA III system has the capability to take the lead role in many missions.
ANKA III will be able to perform missions in addition to reconnaissance, surveillance, intelligence, and attack missions with
various air-to-ground and air-to-air munitions. These missions
include engaging enemy helicopters, propeller-driven aircraft,
and UAVs using air-to-air munitions; conducting hunting operations; neutralizing enemy RF radar and air defense systems;
guarding friendly forces in the air and on the ground; signal and
communication intelligence; electronic warfare; and operations
and communication with other friendly elements.
Our company developed a domestic autopilot system for the
tailless configuration and designed a new controller for the aircraft to enable the system to take off, cruise, and land autonomously. In addition to dual redundant GPS receivers, ANKA III
will also be able to take off and land automatically with a radar
altimeter.

ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle’s missions

• Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Signals Intelligence
• Air-to-Ground Attack
• Strategic Assault Mission
• Air Defense Systems Suppression
• Air Interception
• Support to Naval Operations
• Close Air Support
• Electronic Warfare
• Protection
• Manned-Unmanned Cooperation

ANKA III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle’s main features

• Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW): 6,500 kg
• Payload Capacity: 1,200 kg
• Service Ceiling: 40,000 ft
• Maximum Speed: 0.7 Mach
• Endurance: 10 hours
What's the point of adding wing stations and compromising stealth when Anka-III doesn't even have enough payload capacity to take full advantage of its inner stations? I hope those wing stations can be ejected after launch, or at least removable beforehand if necessary.
 

Hasanrize

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What's the point of adding wing stations and compromising stealth when Anka-III doesn't even have enough payload capacity to take full advantage of its inner stations? I hope those wing stations can be ejected after launch, or at least removable beforehand if necessary.
It doesn't have to have stealth all the time. For example, the F-35 has a beast mode, and Kaan is designed to be higher than the F-22 because there will be another payload there. The same goes for Anka-3. Payload capacity is not so critical because it doesn't have to use heavy weapons all the time, there might be an option to use a high number of small munitions.
 

boredaf

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It doesn't have to have stealth all the time. For example, the F-35 has a beast mode, and Kaan is designed to be higher than the F-22 because there will be another payload there. The same goes for Anka-3. Payload capacity is not so critical because it doesn't have to use heavy weapons all the time, there might be an option to use a high number of small munitions.
Sure, but the importance of this drone is that it can be used like a deep strike aircraft for SEAD/DEAD missions. There is no point on using it to bomb some cave or some terrorist with smaller munitions when the same can be done with Aksungur or Akıncı for cheaper, unless it is for training purposes.
 

Hasanrize

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Sure, but the importance of this drone is that it can be used like a deep strike aircraft for SEAD/DEAD missions. There is no point on using it to bomb some cave or some terrorist with smaller munitions when the same can be done with Aksungur or Akıncı for cheaper, unless it is for training purposes.
You can say the same thing for 5th Gen beast modes. Why use F-35 or Kaan in that configuration when there are cheaper alternatives?
 

boredaf

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You can say the same thing for 5th Gen beast modes. Why use F-35 or Kaan in that configuration when there are cheaper alternatives?
Because those planes have the payload capacity to carry more than what their inner stations allow, whereas Anka-3 doesn't. Carrying 4 small bombs instead of 2 big ones isn't exactly a "beast" mode either.

Not to mention, comparing Anka-3 to F-35 is comparing apples to oranges both in terms of its class and shape. If anything, the comparison should be B-2 or other deep strike crafts, which do not feature outer pylons. Flying wing design is most useful when it is used for deep strike, not a2a engagements, even though I know TAI keeps saying it can also do that.
 
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Anka III simply does not have a big enough radome to put a radar inside for long range BVR combat. It will likely to have a combination of SAR & FLIR in its belly like RQ-170. And A2A engagement is likely to be limited to WVR or near WVR.

ANKA III will be able to perform missions in addition to reconnaissance, surveillance, intelligence, and attack missions with
various air-to-ground and air-to-air munitions. These missions
include engaging enemy helicopters, propeller-driven aircraft,
and UAVs using air-to-air munitions;
 
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uçuyorum

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Anka III simple does not have a big enough radome to put a radar inside for long range BVR combat. It will likely to have a combination of SAR & FLIR in its belly like RQ-170. And A2A engagement is likely to be limited to WVR or near WVR.
I mean legion pod allows use of AMRAAM, so maybe it could havd an IRST like that? Or they could fit a modified radar that's wider and thinner?
 

Strong AI

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Anka III simple does not have a big enough radome to put a radar inside for long range BVR combat. It will likely to have a combination of SAR & FLIR in its belly like RQ-170. And A2A engagement is likely to be limited to WVR or near WVR.
"Radar and air-to-air ammunition will be integrated. As you know, we will also be integrating the radar system that our local company is working on. Afterwards, we will also be able to use air-to-air ammunition."

- ANKA 3 will be a family of flying wing drones, there will be lighter and heavier versions, as well as a naval version (the idea of a naval version was known during the design phase)

- There will be a version with TOYGUN and AESA radar
 

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I mean legion pod allows use of AMRAAM, so maybe it could havd an IRST like that?

Through networking yes, legion pod could do that. You are right, they could put KAAN's IRST on ANKA-III. That would theoretically give it BVR capability.
 

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The most feasible way to do A2A combat with ANKA-3 would be to use it as an extended magazine of sorts for our more air combat oriented platforms.
The US air force already has such plans for B21 Raider.
 

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Because those planes have the payload capacity to carry more than what their inner stations allow, whereas Anka-3 doesn't. Carrying 4 small bombs instead of 2 big ones isn't exactly a "beast" mode either.

Not to mention, comparing Anka-3 to F-35 is comparing apples to oranges both in terms of its class and shape. If anything, the comparison should be B-2 or other deep strike crafts, which do not feature outer pylons. Flying wing design is most useful when it is used for deep strike, not a2a engagements, even though I know TAI keeps saying it can also do that.
Even in the beast mode, Anka-3 is faster and more agile than both Akıncı and Aksungur. You have to keep in mind that the Anka-3 has a turbofan engine, meaning that it is going to change altitude much faster. All those Drones take almost half an hour to reach cruise speed since their engines were optimized for long endurance.
Also, probably even in the beast mode, Anka-3 will have lower RCS compared to Akıncı and Aksungur.
 

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Meanwhile, TAI's UAV division is designing a UCAV that will fly with the F110 or a similar engine. While we attribute a modest role to the ANKA-III... Probably the backlog of the KAAN program provides a very strong infrastructure for TAI's ANKA-X programs. TAI's most important achievement in recent years has been its investments in testing and qualification of designs. When the new campus is fully operational, it will be one of the few facilities in the world that can carry out all the processes from zero to serial production of a combat aircraft. Therefore, I don't think it is a correct analysis to think that the mission descriptions of the concepts shared with the public are just reports written in a vague manner.
 

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Even in the beast mode, Anka-3 is faster and more agile than both Akıncı and Aksungur. You have to keep in mind that the Anka-3 has a turbofan engine, meaning that it is going to change altitude much faster. All those Drones take almost half an hour to reach cruise speed since their engines were optimized for long endurance.
Also, probably even in the beast mode, Anka-3 will have lower RCS compared to Akıncı and Aksungur.
You keep calling it "beast mode" but it isn't a beast mode at all. Beast mode is a code for filling the plane to the brim with weapons, more so than it can carry within its inner stations. When a F-35 goes into beast mode it more than doubles its payload capacity.

Anka-3's inner stations have more capacity than it can carry in total, 650x2 vs 1200kg payload capacity. It's not a "beast mode", it is a choice between compromising stealth to carry 2 more bombs with lower yield and shorter range at 4 pylons vs carrying 2 higher yield bombs with longer range without compromising stealth. I, personally, would much rather it just carried 2x Som-J (500 to 550kgs each with 250+ kms range).
 

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Perhaps bombing cave with NEB bomb that weight 1+ ton 😅😂

Well within Akıncı's capabilities tho.

From 2021:
"The AKINCI Attack Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) flew for 13 hours and 24 minutes with a payload of 1,360 kilograms. It was also noted that the AKINCI TİHA carried a penetrating bomb (NEB) developed locally by TÜBİTAK SAGE under the fuselage, and that it rose to an altitude of 9,144 meters (30,000 feet). AKINCI's take-off weight exceeded 6 tons in total."

This is the exact kind of mission profile Akıncı should have assumed by now.
 

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It takes one to be loser for not deliberately mentioning TR in this article, even while mentioning countries that secured a deal with TR. Not a big source of the information nor well written but anything, but total show of being a loser.



yeah look who wrote the article...


this is what i found....



Mandip Singh
 

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