Indonesia Infrastructure Program and Progress

Indos

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Patimban port project that is planned to be the biggest port in Indonesia some day hasnt yet finished its first phase development (access road + port), and I think it will likely to finish some where in the first semester of 2021 inshaAllah.

It is hoped to create new industrial zone in Western Java province. Jakarta satellite cities that are mostly part of West Java province have also become one of main drives of our national industrialization since 1990 where the first industrial zone was made there.

So I think West Java can still become one of our main economic engines for the next 30 years and I believe many people living in Jakarta still prefer to relocate to West Java than any areas in Indonesia due to its closeness with Jakarta, their home town.

Patimban port progress as December 2020. This project hopefully can make Rebana Triangle areas become very industrialized in the future.

 
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https://www.thejakartapost.com/news...e-project-on-track-thales-indonesia-says.html

Satria satellite project on track, Thales Indonesia says
Eisya A. Eloksari The Jakarta Post Jakarta / Tue, December 15, 2020 / 01:48 pm

1608305468863.png

The Satellite of Republic Indonesia (Satria) project, the country’s biggest telecommunication satellite to date, is on track for launch in 2023 despite prior talks of delay because of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to an executive from the project’s manufacturer.

Thales Indonesia president director Erik-Jan Raatgerink said that while the pandemic had delayed the initial kick-off and interfered with communications, the manufacturing was progressing as scheduled.

“Fortunately, we have not faced huge challenges. The program is on track,” he told The Jakarta Post in an exclusive interview on Dec. 10. “The schedule is tight but we are moving full speed ahead to have it delivered in 2023.”

Thales Group subsidiary Thales Alenia Space (TAS) is the aerospace manufacturer for Satria, a public-private partnership (PPP) project with an estimated investment of US$550 million.

Earlier on Nov. 23, Communications and Information Minister Johnny G. Plate stated that the government had forecast a delay in the launch of Satria to the fourth quarter of 2023 from the planned launch in March 2023, due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.

Johnny said at the time that the pandemic had affected Satria’s procurement and production, adding that the disruption was considered a force majeure.

The government has also prepared a plan in case there is even a longer delay in the satellite launch, according to Johnny.

The satellite is envisioned to improve connectivity in the country, providing free internet to 150,000 public facilities, including schools, regional government offices and health facilities.

“Satria is a critical digital infrastructure and it is just the first step in providing broader internet connection in Indonesia. I think the country is at the starting point of having digital satellite-based infrastructure,” Raatgerink said.

The latest Indonesian Internet Providers Association (APJII) survey shows that the country’s internet penetration rate rose to 73.7 percent in 2019 from 64.8 percent in 2018.

Meanwhile, Raatgerink went on to say that while Thales Indonesia had been focused on providing services for defense projects, the company has also been working on the civil market, such as smart airport and smart city projects over the last decade.

Thales is working with state-owned airport operator PT Angkasa Pura I to provide cloud-based infrastructure to optimize airport security, customs and immigration operations, among others, he said.

The project will be implemented in the company’s managed airports in Yogyakarta and Bali. In the future, he added that Thales would also be interested in the Communications and Information Ministry’s national data center project, as well as a PPP program for smart transportation with the Jakarta administration, called Jak Lingko.

According to the Jakarta administration’s website, Jak Lingko is an integrated public transportation system, including in routes, management and payment. It aims to provide ease and flat fares for trips using a combination of transportation modes, including angkot (public minivans), buses and rail systems in Jakarta.

“We’re really keen on doing PPP with Jak Lingko to integrate all e-money systems for various modes of transportation, toll roads and parking. Our local investors are designing a solution for that and we hope we can present to the Jakarta administration in the coming months,” he said.​
 

trishna_amrta

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https://www.thejakartapost.com/news...e-project-on-track-thales-indonesia-says.html

Satria satellite project on track, Thales Indonesia says
Eisya A. Eloksari The Jakarta Post Jakarta / Tue, December 15, 2020 / 01:48 pm

The Satellite of Republic Indonesia (Satria) project, the country’s biggest telecommunication satellite to date, is on track for launch in 2023 despite prior talks of delay because of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to an executive from the project’s manufacturer.

Thales Indonesia president director Erik-Jan Raatgerink said that while the pandemic had delayed the initial kick-off and interfered with communications, the manufacturing was progressing as scheduled.

“Fortunately, we have not faced huge challenges. The program is on track,” he told The Jakarta Post in an exclusive interview on Dec. 10. “The schedule is tight but we are moving full speed ahead to have it delivered in 2023.”

Thales Group subsidiary Thales Alenia Space (TAS) is the aerospace manufacturer for Satria, a public-private partnership (PPP) project with an estimated investment of US$550 million.

Earlier on Nov. 23, Communications and Information Minister Johnny G. Plate stated that the government had forecast a delay in the launch of Satria to the fourth quarter of 2023 from the planned launch in March 2023, due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.

Johnny said at the time that the pandemic had affected Satria’s procurement and production, adding that the disruption was considered a force majeure.

The government has also prepared a plan in case there is even a longer delay in the satellite launch, according to Johnny.

The satellite is envisioned to improve connectivity in the country, providing free internet to 150,000 public facilities, including schools, regional government offices and health facilities.

“Satria is a critical digital infrastructure and it is just the first step in providing broader internet connection in Indonesia. I think the country is at the starting point of having digital satellite-based infrastructure,” Raatgerink said.

The latest Indonesian Internet Providers Association (APJII) survey shows that the country’s internet penetration rate rose to 73.7 percent in 2019 from 64.8 percent in 2018.

Meanwhile, Raatgerink went on to say that while Thales Indonesia had been focused on providing services for defense projects, the company has also been working on the civil market, such as smart airport and smart city projects over the last decade.

Thales is working with state-owned airport operator PT Angkasa Pura I to provide cloud-based infrastructure to optimize airport security, customs and immigration operations, among others, he said.

The project will be implemented in the company’s managed airports in Yogyakarta and Bali. In the future, he added that Thales would also be interested in the Communications and Information Ministry’s national data center project, as well as a PPP program for smart transportation with the Jakarta administration, called Jak Lingko.

According to the Jakarta administration’s website, Jak Lingko is an integrated public transportation system, including in routes, management and payment. It aims to provide ease and flat fares for trips using a combination of transportation modes, including angkot (public minivans), buses and rail systems in Jakarta.

“We’re really keen on doing PPP with Jak Lingko to integrate all e-money systems for various modes of transportation, toll roads and parking. Our local investors are designing a solution for that and we hope we can present to the Jakarta administration in the coming months,” he said.​
That article is confusing me a lot. As if each paragraph was telling a different story that is unrelated to the others. But then again its Jakarta Post so no surprise there.

The satellite is envisioned to improve connectivity in the country, providing free internet to 150,000 public facilities, including schools, regional government offices and health facilities.
Extremely doubtful for so many technical reasons

“Satria is a critical digital infrastructure and it is just the first step in providing broader internet connection in Indonesia. I think the country is at the starting point of having digital satellite-based infrastructure,” Raatgerink said.​
It will not and shouldn't be put into such role
 

Indos

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Patimban port project that is planned to be the biggest port in Indonesia some day hasnt yet finished its first phase development (access road + port), and I think it will likely to finish some where in the first semester of 2021 inshaAllah.

It is hoped to create new industrial zone in Western Java province. Jakarta satellite cities that are mostly part of West Java province have also become one of main drives of our national industrialization since 1990 where the first industrial zone was made there.

So I think West Java can still become one of our main economic engines for the next 30 years and I believe many people living in Jakarta still prefer to relocate to West Java than any areas in Indonesia due to its closeness with Jakarta, their home town.

Patimban port progress as December 2020. This project hopefully can make Rebana Triangle areas become very industrialized in the future.


Some of new Industrial park project/plan in Rebana triangle region (West Java)

State owned company (PT PTPN VIII)


Private owned company (Surya Cipta)


Private owned company (Bumi Mas Group)

 
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trishna_amrta

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A little survey question for Indonesian. I ask this to get more "feel" of internet usage within a specific market niche.

What internet provider / operator do you use for your own personal use or personal business (if applicable)? And if you don't mind, pls also stated how much money you've spent monthly for all those internet subscriptions. If your internet connection is mostly "numpang gratisan" also pls stated as such. And also state anything else pertinent to your internet subscription (whatever that is). Thanks Beforehand :)

My current internet subscriptions is as follows ;
  1. 3 (Hutchison). Primary day-to-day internet subscription
  2. XL Axiata. Secondary internet subscription
  3. IM3 Ooredoo. Backup & special purpose
  4. Hawaii Pacific Teleport. Ku-band VSAT
  5. Inmarsat BGAN, L-band and only use when absolutely necessary. So far I only kept this for testing & evaluation purpose only.
Overall pertinent to internet connection (TCP/IP) I've typically spent around $250 / monthly for those subscriptions.
 

Madokafc

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A little survey question for Indonesian. I ask this to get more "feel" of internet usage within a specific market niche.

What internet provider / operator do you use for your own personal use or personal business (if applicable)? And if you don't mind, pls also stated how much money you've spent monthly for all those internet subscriptions. If your internet connection is mostly "numpang gratisan" also pls stated as such. And also state anything else pertinent to your internet subscription (whatever that is). Thanks Beforehand :)

My current internet subscriptions is as follows ;
  1. 3 (Hutchison). Primary day-to-day internet subscription
  2. XL Axiata. Secondary internet subscription
  3. IM3 Ooredoo. Backup & special purpose
  4. Hawaii Pacific Teleport. Ku-band VSAT
  5. Inmarsat BGAN, L-band and only use when absolutely necessary. So far I only kept this for testing & evaluation purpose only.
Overall pertinent to internet connection (TCP/IP) I've typically spent around $250 / monthly for those subscriptions.

Since long time use Speedy and spending more than 5,4 million rupiah per month
 

trishna_amrta

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$##@!! why is this so expensive???, wah lao!
I'm "priority customer" at 3 (Hutchison) & XL Axiata. And If the overall expenses sound expensive to you, should see how much Inmarsat BGAN rate, it is ridiculously expensive to the point the only viable use is for text only instant messaging such as WhatsApp, Telegram, Signal, etc. Which is the main reason I only use it if there is absolute necessity and for testing & evaluation.
Most of my internet expenses goes for VSAT service. Connecting to anything beyond LEO (Low Earth Orbit) has always been at premium rate. Which is why I have high hope that SpaceX Starlink would deliver end user equipments to Indonesia and set up ground stations near Indonesia (preferably at Singapore or Australia).
 

Logam42

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@Nilgiri

In short, both Trishna & Madoka are high-end users.

For mobile internet costs, Indonesia is actually one of the cheapest globally if only counting costs per gigabyte (though note our speed is a bit meh)

Source: https://www.cable.co.uk/mobiles/worldwide-data-pricing/

As for broadband internet, both for package costs and per megabit, we are among rank 55-70 out of 211 countries in term of affordability.

Source: Worldwide Internet Costs Survey (XLS Format)

Indonesia actually has had a fall in prices over the last 3 years due to a price war among our lead providers Telkomsel, Indoset, and Axiata. Hopefully once the rollout of Palapa Ring, i.e when the supporting infrastructure and secondary services built on it come into operation, the margins will improve again and prices will fall even more.
 

Nilgiri

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@Nilgiri

In short, both Trishna & Madoka are high-end users.

For mobile internet costs, Indonesia is actually one of the cheapest globally if only counting costs per gigabyte (though note our speed is a bit meh)

Source: https://www.cable.co.uk/mobiles/worldwide-data-pricing/

As for broadband internet, both for package costs and per megabit, we are among rank 55-70 out of 211 countries in term of affordability.

Source: Worldwide Internet Costs Survey (XLS Format)

Indonesia actually has had a fall in prices over the last 3 years due to a price war among our lead providers Telkomsel, Indoset, and Axiata. Hopefully once the rollout of Palapa Ring, i.e when the supporting infrastructure and secondary services built on it come into operation, the margins will improve again and prices will fall even more.

Yep, things make more sense to me now....and now I feel bad looking at that map, coz it proves we are getting ripped off super bad in Canada for sure.
 

trishna_amrta

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I feel bad looking at that map, coz it proves we are getting ripped off super bad in Canada for sure.
Operating cost & labour cost are far... far... higher at North America. Not to mention equipment cost. As I recall the entire Anglosphere countries also shunt Huawei right? That alone raise equipment & labour cost. Another aspect is pricing scheme. Those of us who pay very cheap bandwidth price are typically paying it by volume (usage) rather than for fix amount of time. Example all my Indonesia based subscription are volume based, meaning I only paid what I've actually used. And unlike most people, I'm extremely tight of what traffic goes in / out of my networks and where they go & routed. This is the main reason most of my internet expense goes to the US based VSAT subscription, because it is time based albeit with very small bandwidth, but no complaint there because I need it in the middle of nowhere (at the fringe of a highland jungle). And besides I only use it for crypto mining, which basically just transactional data traffic anyway

BTW my Indonesia based subscription cost me roughly around ¢7 / GB (that is US cent)
 
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Nilgiri

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Operating cost & labour cost are far... far... higher at North America. Not to mention equipment cost. As I recall the entire Anglosphere countries also shunt Huawei right? That alone raise equipment & labour cost. Another aspect is pricing scheme. Those of us who pay very cheap bandwidth price are typically paying it by volume (usage) rather than for fix amount of time. Example all my Indonesia based subscription are volume based, meaning I only paid what I've actually used. And unlike most people, I'm extremely tight of what traffic goes in / out of my networks and where they go & routed. This is the main reason most of my internet expense goes to the US based VSAT subscription, because it is time based albeit with very small bandwidth, but no complaint there because I need it in the middle of nowhere (at the fringe of a highland jungle). And besides I only use it for crypto mining, which basically just transactional data traffic anyway

BTW my Indonesia based subscription cost me roughly around ¢7 / GB (that is US cent)

Yes, but Canada follows some strange policies that make it extra bad on top (existed well before in earlier gen like 2G etc with the effective duopoly or even monopoly)....exacerbating its large geography + population conundrum (compared to say US or Europe)

Anyway long story and off topic.
 

Initial_D

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A little survey question for Indonesian. I ask this to get more "feel" of internet usage within a specific market niche.

What internet provider / operator do you use for your own personal use or personal business (if applicable)? And if you don't mind, pls also stated how much money you've spent monthly for all those internet subscriptions. If your internet connection is mostly "numpang gratisan" also pls stated as such. And also state anything else pertinent to your internet subscription (whatever that is). Thanks Beforehand :)

My current internet subscriptions is as follows ;
  1. 3 (Hutchison). Primary day-to-day internet subscription
  2. XL Axiata. Secondary internet subscription
  3. IM3 Ooredoo. Backup & special purpose
  4. Hawaii Pacific Teleport. Ku-band VSAT
  5. Inmarsat BGAN, L-band and only use when absolutely necessary. So far I only kept this for testing & evaluation purpose only.
Overall pertinent to internet connection (TCP/IP) I've typically spent around $250 / monthly for those subscriptions.
Megavision for home/wifii/cable tv connection, Rp.400k
And use Telkomsel simpati for my cellphone internet connection, i spent only Rp 180k (50gb) monthly, my wife use Telkomsel also with bigger data package, she used 100gb package permonth (Rp300k), sometimes more
 
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Indos

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Description (Google Translate)

Indonesia is a country with rice fields and fields stretching across its islands, where tens of millions of people live from agriculture. For them, the government focuses on building infrastructure, especially dams and irrigation. During 2015-2020, the government has built 18 new dams throughout the country.

From the Rajui and Payaseunara Dam in Aceh, Titab in Bali, Bajulmati and Nipah in East Java, Raknamo and Rotiklot in NTT, and others to the Tapin Dam in South Kalimantan. We will continue to build the dam.

The government is targeting as many as 61 new dams throughout Indonesia to be completed in stages until 2024. The development of dam infrastructure and irrigation channels is our effort to become a sovereign nation in the food sector.

18 Dams for the Nation

 

Indos

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What is the current sufficiency level...like how much food does Indonesia import compared to export etc?

Well for rice we are quite sufficient, we only import rice if the price is up to control inflation (which is I am against). Last year we dont import rice, maybe very small amount like Biryani rice for very niche market. Our agricultural sector doesnt export much, but we do some export despite not really large. Some agricultural commodities cannot fulfill domestic demand like corn (for chicken breeding) and cane (including the sugar mills production) so we import them a lot.

Just some snapshot about our agricultural industry.



We still need to produce more rice due to increasing population growth at 1 percent a year
 
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Nilgiri

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Well for rice we are quite sufficient, we only import rice if the rice is up (which is I am against) to control inflation. Last year we dont import rice, maybe very small amount like Biryani rice for very niche market. Our agricultural sector doesnt export much, but we do some export despite not really large. Some agricultural commodities cannot fulfill domestic demand like corn (for chicken breeding) and cane (including the sugar mills production) so we import them a lot.

Just some snapshot about our agricultural industry.



We still need to produce more rice due to increasing population growth at 1 percent a year

Yah because at OEC:


The foodstuffs (in 2018) was about 9 billion export and 8 billion import.

More or less I would say Indonesia is self sufficient from a trade standpoint.

I would say its sovereign nation in food already. (I think I understand what you mean here).

The 8 billion import demand (soybean meal, raw sugar, tobacco are biggest 3) can be looked at somewhat for competitiveness within Indonesia, but there is balance here as you have to look at input costs (land, water, fertilizer, labour etc) etc and tradeoffs for these items i.e it may just be better to import those and focus on competitiveness elsewhere (both agro and non agro).

It is for example why I absolutely hate India for producing and exporting so much sugar it does (by promoting and keeping so much subsidy for various farmer lobby reasons), we are not pricing in our water fairly for example (And many other opportunity costs like growing something more valuable or nutritious protein etc using less inputs).

It is having other costs outside of the rupee/dollar value realm.

A country like Brazil on other hand has huge surplus water and land compared to us, we really ought to just export less sugar, or even zero and even import sugar from more comeptitive countries for it.

I feel Indonesia must also judge all such things fairly for itself too, to get the best value added and competitiveness it can.

Exporting more and importing less is not always exporting better and importing better. It depends very heavily what you are pricing in and pricing out in first place.
 

Madokafc

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Yah because at OEC:


The foodstuffs (in 2018) was about 9 billion export and 8 billion import.

More or less I would say Indonesia is self sufficient from a trade standpoint.

I would say its sovereign nation in food already. (I think I understand what you mean here).

The 8 billion import demand (soybean meal, raw sugar, tobacco are biggest 3) can be looked at somewhat for competitiveness within Indonesia, but there is balance here as you have to look at input costs (land, water, fertilizer, labour etc) etc and tradeoffs for these items i.e it may just be better to import those and focus on competitiveness elsewhere (both agro and non agro).

It is for example why I absolutely hate India for producing and exporting so much sugar it does (by promoting and keeping so much subsidy for various farmer lobby reasons), we are not pricing in our water fairly for example (And many other opportunity costs like growing something more valuable or nutritious protein etc using less inputs).

It is having other costs outside of the rupee/dollar value realm.

A country like Brazil on other hand has huge surplus water and land compared to us, we really ought to just export less sugar, or even zero and even import sugar from more comeptitive countries for it.

I feel Indonesia must also judge all such things fairly for itself too, to get the best value added and competitiveness it can.

Exporting more and importing less is not always exporting better and importing better. It depends very heavily what you are pricing in and pricing out in first place.

The biggest grain import is wheat, as wheat is very much has many usage in Indonesia food and beverage industry, especially bread and noodle
 

Nicoz

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A little survey question for Indonesian. I ask this to get more "feel" of internet usage within a specific market niche.

What internet provider / operator do you use for your own personal use or personal business (if applicable)? And if you don't mind, pls also stated how much money you've spent monthly for all those internet subscriptions. If your internet connection is mostly "numpang gratisan" also pls stated as such. And also state anything else pertinent to your internet subscription (whatever that is). Thanks Beforehand :)

My current internet subscriptions is as follows ;
  1. 3 (Hutchison). Primary day-to-day internet subscription
  2. XL Axiata. Secondary internet subscription
  3. IM3 Ooredoo. Backup & special purpose
  4. Hawaii Pacific Teleport. Ku-band VSAT
  5. Inmarsat BGAN, L-band and only use when absolutely necessary. So far I only kept this for testing & evaluation purpose only.
Overall pertinent to internet connection (TCP/IP) I've typically spent around $250 / monthly for those subscriptions.

My internet subscription as follow

- First Media 60 mbps (470 k)
- telkomsel Halo ( 200 k)
- telkomsel simpati (140 k)

The irony is, I work at one of the NAP in Indonesia but cant enjoy our own service due to my neighbourhood not on a viably commercial area there goes my 50 % discount.
 

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